Australian national maritime museum

Annual Report 2001–2002

Our vision is to be the nation’s most dynamic cultural resource, enriching lives by promoting knowledge and enjoyment of Australia’s relationship with its waterways and the sea.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2002

ISSN 1034-5019

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Australian National Maritime Museum

The Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) at Darling Harbour, Sydney, opens
9.30 am–5.00 pm every day (open 9.30 am–6.00 pm January.). Closed 25 December

Entry at 30 June 2001
Museum Ticket – adult $10, child/concession $6, family $25
Navy Ticket – adult $14, child/concession $7, family $30
James Craig Ticket – adult $14, child/concession $7, family $30
Big Ticket – adult $20, child/concession $10, family $45

Executive, Commercial & Visitor Services, Building Services:
2 Murray Street Darling Harbour NSW

Vaughan Evans Library, Curators, Registration, Conservation, Design, Volunteers & ANMM
Administration, Sydney Heritage Fleet, HM Bark Endeavour Foundation:
Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre, Pyrmont NSW

Fleet Maintenance Base: Balls Head Drive, Berrys Bay, Waverton NSW
Mailing address GPO Box 5131 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia

Telephone (02) 9298 3777 Facsimile (02) 9298 3780

Web Site (including this Annual Report) http://www.anmm.gov.au

Contact Officer

For enquiries about this report please contact the editor
telephone (02) 9298 3647 facsimile (02) 9298 3670 email [email protected]
Editor Jeffrey Mellefont ANMM
Photographer Andrew Frolows ANMM
Graphic Design Janise Barcenilla
Layout & Production Vanda Graphics
Printed in Australia by Halkeas Printing

Chairman’s Message

It gives me great pleasure to present to you, for my first time as Chairman, the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Annual Report 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002. It records another year of lively, diverse activities and exhibitions from this still quite young organisation.

My appointment to head the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum came as a significant milestone in the organisation’s development was approaching. As I was meeting the staff for the first time, they were busy preparing a program of events and exhibitions to celebrate the museum’s first decade of being open to the public.

There was much to celebrate. The museum has established for itself a substantial place in the nation’s cultural life, and a substantial reputation among the maritime museums of the world. The first decade was one of development and adaptation to a changing environment, as the organisation pursued its goal of being a dynamic cultural resource to promote knowledge and enjoyment of a rich maritime heritage.

Coming at the beginning of a new century and milennium, this anniversary has also been a time to assess and plan for future decades and directions. It’s evident to me that the staff, the capable core of volunteers and my fellow Councillors have the experience, ability and commitment to do that well.

I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to our Council member John Kirby who died in April this year. John was a driving force behind the establishment of the new Australian National Maritime Foundation announced on page 7, and we were truly saddened that he was no longer with us for its launch at the museum in May.

Helping to chart the museum’s future and contribute to its management and governance is something I look forward to. My predecessors as Chair of this museum – Kay Cottee and Peter Doyle, both legendary Australians in their own way, and both great contributors to the nation’s maritime life – have left me solid foundations on which to build.

With the continued support of the Australian government, the museum’s existing sponsors and supporters – including our valued Members organisation – and with increasing involvement from corporate and private patrons, I look forward to reporting even greater achievements at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Mark Bethwaite, Chairman
Australian National Maritime Museum
 
 

CONTENTS

Vision statement  i

Contact officer  ii

Chairman’s message iii

Section 1 Year in review

Mission statement 1

Highlights at a glance 2

Director’s overview 4

Travelling & temporary exhibitions, major events 12

Section 2 Program performance reporting

Key Result Area 1 Service

Objectives & program summary 20

Customer service, visitor profile, focus on visitors,
capital works, venue hire & catering, The Store, Sydney By Sail,
human resource management, communications & information

Key Result Area 2 Products & Programs

Objective & program summary 24

Innovative maritime heritage programs,
education and children’s programs, curatorial programs,
USA Gallery, maritime archaeology, Indigenous affairs

Key Result Area 3 Maritime Heritage

Objectives & program summary 30

Acquisitions and donations, fleet section, conservation,
Vaughan Evans Library, registration

Key Result Area 4 Profile & Image

Objectives & program summary 36

Marketing & media, market research,
publications, corporate support, Members,
volunteers, The Welcome Wall

Section 3 Financial statements

Statement by Council members 41

Independent audit report 42

Statement of financial performance 44

Statement of financial position 45

Statement of cash flows 46

Schedule of commitments 47

Schedule of contingencies 48

Notes 49

Section 4 Appendixes

1 Visitors & Members programs 71

2 Selected acquisitions 75

3 Donors to the National Maritime Collection 78

4 ANMM publications 84

5 Staff publications 85

6 Staff conference papers & lectures 87

7 Staff media appearances 88

8 Staff professional appointments 90

9 Staff overseas travel 90

10 Sponsors, Patrons & Supporters 91

11 Corporate & supporting Members 92

12 MMAPPS grants 94

13 Organisation chart at 30 June 2002 96

14 Staffing overview & resources 97

15 Council members 98

16 Council meetings & committees 100

17 Australian National Maritime Foundation 101

18 APS staff at 30 June 2001 102

19 Volunteers 106

20 Volunteer speakers panel 108

21 Customer Service Charter 109

22 Statutory information requirements 110

Effectiveness in managing human resources

Industrial democracy

Occupational health & safety

Workplace diversity
Commonwealth disability strategy
Access and equity

Environmental performance
Corporate governance

Developments in external scrutiny

Reports by the Auditor General

Fraud control

Consultants

Advertising & market research

Freedom of information

23 List of Acts administered 111

24 Functions & powers of the minister 111

25 Functions & powers of the museum 112

26 Director’s statement 112

27 Index 113
 
 
 


Section 1

The Year in Review

our mission IS:

To focus primarily on people and to strive to make their contacts with the museum memorable and enjoyable.

To bring to life memories and experiences of Australia’s maritime past and to preserve our maritime heritage for future generations.

To encourage a broad view of maritime history and to promote
awareness of contemporary issues through innovative and entertaining programs and products.

To research, acquire, conserve, interpret and present Australia’s
maritime heritage. To develop and maintain the National Maritime Collection, to foster traditional skills and to preserve maritime practices.

To provide leadership and encouragement to other museums
and communities and to represent Australia’s maritime
heritage internationally.
 
 

Highlights 2001–2002

? Ran a festive season of programs to celebrate the museum’s 10th birthday – 3.55 million visitors in its first decade

? Launched the Australian National Maritime Foundation to support the National Maritime Collection

? Staged the first Food at Sea Festival – Eating & Drinking with Sailors 1600–2000 over four weeks in spring

? Opened Watermarks – adventure, sport, play in the ANZ Gallery, the museum’s largest-ever exhibition redevelopment

? With Sweden’s Vasa Museum, produced and toured the exhibition VASA 1628: Strange fate of a King’s warship featuring artefacts from this unique archaeological find

? Developed our biggest-ever children’s activity program and exhibition PLAY: kids + water = fun celebrating children’s love of water

? Won the 2002 NSW Specialty Venue of the Year award, recognising the success of our commercial venue hire operation

? Record demand for our schools programs included 42 sessions of Year 12 chemistry workshop Shipwrecks & Salvage; gallery theatre program The Prospectors booked out for three terms

? Lars & Harold Halvorsen Collection – plans, photographs, tools and records from 75 years of Australian boatbuilding – donated by Halvorsen family members

? Unveiled the 10,000th name engraved on the Welcome Wall, our national celebration of migration to Australia
 
 

Director’s overview

Our first decade

The Australian National Maritime Museum turned 10 years old in November 2001. We took this milestone as an opportunity to assess what’s been achieved since Prime Minister Bob Hawke launched the museum on 30 November 1991, and where it’s headed. It’s a fair assessment that the museum’s been running full and bye, as the old-time sailors used to say, with the wind in its sails and a bone in its teeth.

In a decade when museum attendances worldwide have decreased in the face of stiff competition from an explosion of new attractions and entertainments, Australia’s new National Maritime Museum drew more than 3.5 million visitors to its harbourside site. The attendance curve has generally been travelling upwards. With annual visitations sometimes exceeding 400,000 this is already one of the world’s most-visited maritime museums. But attendances are only one measure of a museum’s success.

One of our most notable achievements has been to broaden the vision of maritime museums – and with it, of what it is to be Australians. Notwithstanding the myth that the the outback is the defining Australian experience, most of us live close to the coast. What the museum explores is the way that maritime experiences and themes have shaped – and still influence – our lives and our culture.

We pay special attention to powerful Indigenous spiritual and cultural links to these waterways and lands. They offer all of us a greater understanding of, and connection to, this ancient island continent. We re-examine the great waves of migration that have landed people on our shores, because that’s at the heart of who and what Australians are. And we look at the way water marks our Australian culture through play, sport and adventure – without, of course, ignoring the classic maritime museum fare of explorers, naval and shipping history.

Communicating this vision, and overcoming preconceptions that a maritime museum appealed only to enthusiasts and sailors, were an early challenge. Museum staff worked hard to develop and market exhibitions, activities and entertainment that appeal to families. Teachers have come to know that the museum provides a high focus on current curricula, and trained teacher guides to ensure quality class visits. Domestic and international tourists now realise that there’s much on offer here, too.

We have developed a special talent for finding outstanding exhibitions overseas, bringing them here and often touring them around Australia and New Zealand. Among them was the replica of the great 17th-century Dutch East Indiaman Batavia from The Netherlands which visited for the Olympic year. Before it there was a Russian submarine, a pod of robotic whales from the Pacific Science Centre in Seattle, USA, evocative artefacts from Henry VIII’s warship Mary Rose,and an environmental exhibition Ocean Planet from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.

In this first decade the museum has shown 12 exhibitions from overseas. This was the first major institution in Australia to send an imported exhibition to a regional centre, when Mary Rose visited Warrnambool in 1994. More have followed since then.

In all, the museum has shown more than 80 temporary exhibitions, on topics as diverse as our maritime heritage. They have included paintings by waterside workers, a Japanese midget submarine that attacked Sydney in World War II, beautiful China Trade artworks from the Pearl River Delta ports, and a superb collection of bark paintings (subsequently acquired by the museum) that spells out the sea rights claimed by the Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land. One of our biggest exhibitions, Tears, Fears and CheersMigration to Australia 1788–1998, won the prestigious National Multicultural Marketing Award in 1999 in competition with many large national corporations.

Along with exhibitions we have developed a huge variety of programs that expose Australia’s maritime past and present to new and wider audiences. These have included theatre, festivals, seminars, lectures, domestic and overseas tours, workshops, demonstrations, classes, food and musical events, a variety of activities afloat, and publications. Our Classic & Wooden Boat Festivals, to take just one example, have become popular family weekends that celebrate heritage in the broadest sense.

Developments in the museum’s first decade have changed its face and expanded the services offered – none more so than the new Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre which created a greater maritime heritage precinct in the heart of this harbourside city. But what is certain is that the coming decades will be just as dynamic and visionary as the first, building on this maritime museum’s standing among the world’s finest.

Best of the birthday year

The exhibitions and festivals that filled our busy
year are detailed one by one, starting on page 12. Several of them were grouped over the spring and summer to mark the museum’s 10th anniversary. This began with the inaugural Food at Sea Festival Eating & Drinking with Sailors 1600–2000, using something everyone shares an interest in – dining! – to explore different facets of maritime history. This multifaceted, month-long program included cooking demonstrations in a recreated galley by guest sea-cooks ranging from submariners to celebrity sailors; lectures and tastings; theatre for children and adults; and an exhibition on food preservation. We hope to make it a recurring attraction.

Opening VASA 1628 – Strange fate of a King’s warship, from one of Europe’s most popular tourist attractions, was a specially proud achievement. We worked for three years with Stockholm’s Vasa Museum to create a travelling exhibition about this enormously significant shipwreck recovery and preservation. Many of its artefacts and magnificent wooden sculptures were leaving Sweden for the first time. It then toured to other venues in Australia.

In the summer we unveiled a huge new exhibition that explores Australia’s well-known passion for aquatic pursuits. Watermarks – adventure, sport & play is big, bright and boisterous. It’s the largest exhibition project the museum has undertaken since its opening, occupying the 34-metre high ANZ Tall Gallery previously dominated by the America’s Cup winning yacht Australia II. In its place are watercraft of all kinds, from the beautiful to the unexpected, and a myriad of Australian stories. One being revealed for the first time was the incredible adventure of Oskar

Speck who paddled a kayak from Germany to Australia over seven years in the 1930s, based on his papers, photographs and film footage which were bequeathed to the museum. The story stimulated an avalanche of interest from Australian and international media.

Associated with Watermarks’ opening was our most ambitious summer family attraction so far, a combination of exhibition and activities called PLAY: kids + water = fun, developed with the input of a Kids Advisory Group from a local primary school. We marked the bicentenary of Flinders’ 1801–03 circumnavigation of Australia with Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders. And we were pleased, too, to be able to mount a full-size reproduction of the Sydney Wharfies Mural in the Wharf 7 public foyer. The fragile original of this important record of waterfront labour history, painted on a wall at union headquarters in the 1950s, was donated by the Maritime Union of Australia.

It was a notable year in the development of Indigenous themes at the museum. We created our first permanent position of Indigenous curator and liaison officer, to advise the museum on collecting, interpreting and educating in this area, and to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. In a collaboration with Elcho Island Arts & Craft Centre and Bandingan Aboriginal Arts & Craft we displayed a breathtaking collection of 60 sacred ceremonial sculptures from Elcho Island, the Banumbirr –Morning Star Poles. And we mounted a display of HSC Aboriginal Studies students’ major works, a creative array of artworks and research projects relating to Aboriginal people and communities.

Section 2 of this Annual Report records more of the events of the year, and the museum’s achievements in its 10th year of operations in the areas of collecting, collections management, education and commercial activities.

Australian National Maritime Foundation

In May 2002 the Australian National Maritime Foundation was launched to support development of the National Maritime Collection. The foundation reflects our determination to put more resources into the collection. We want to build up a fund so that we can compete more effectively to acquire those heritage items that all too often disappear from the auction rooms into private hands or even leave the country. The foundation’s objectives are to:

• create a capital fund through gifts, bequests and fund-raising activities to develop
the historical collection

• receive gifts and bequests for specific activities relating to the museum and its collection

• support the museum and its collection generally.

Supporters of the foundation can make donations at any one of seven levels ranging upwards from $1,000, or can make bequests to the museum.
Or they can encourage others to support the museum in this way. Benefits include deductibility for income tax purposes, and public acknowledgement of their support.

Foundation Chairman is Mr Bill Cutbush, a company director and enthusiastic supporter of the museum. At the foundation launch he said ‘Our strategy is not just to raise record amounts in next to no time. We want to seek out people in the community who have interests similar to the museum, who may like to get to know the museum and its work and help it in the longer term to reach its collecting objectives. We want potential donors and benefactors to enjoy a developing relationship with this museum… a relationship built on common interests, confidence and trust.’

Outreach

Reaching out beyond our locality and right around Australia is, of course, essential for a national institution. Foremost among the museum’s outreach programs is the maritime heritage grants scheme called MMAPSS (the Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme), administered by us and jointly funded by the museum and the Commonwealth Government’s Distributed National Collection Program. The grants are for restoration, conservation, collection management and exhibition development. This year’s record 16 grants totalling $35,055 bring to 78 the total of projects supported across all Australian states and most of its territories since the scheme’s inception in 1995. They appear in Appendix 12.

The museum funds an internship program which allows staff or volunteers from other small organisations to work with our staff, paying for living expenses while they are with us. This year’s internship was awarded to the Broome Historical Society, whose curator worked in our registration section studying collections management practice.

Travelling exhibitions and publications are another way in which we reach the nation. Our travelling Centenary of Federation exhibition Smugglers – Customs & Contraband 1901–2001 continues to tour to venues around the country. Our widely-distributed quarterly journal Signals keeps institutions, individuals and Members around the country abreast of our activities, while our retail outlet The Store is developing distribution networks to ensure that our various publications (Appendix 4) reach wider audiences.

Our museum professionals offer their expertise to many organisations and individuals. Staff responded in person to more than 5,000 research and other related enquiries this year, while the growing number of research resources on the museum website assist many more.

Staff helping in this way include our maritime archaeologists, conservators, curators and the research librarians from our Vaughan Evans Library. The graphic design department advised the Lord Howe Island Historical Society on the concept development for its new maritime history gallery, with its themes of coastal shipping and flying boats. And we provide material assistance to organisations such as Sydney Heritage Fleet and the HM Bark Endeavour Foundation.

The museum’s two highly-qualified and experienced underwater archaeologists returned to the USA for a third season searching for the remains of James Cook’s Endeavour believed sunk in Newport, Rhode Island in 1778. They were advising and assisting the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project. This exciting project has been supported by the Commonwealth Government and corporate sponsors, and generates great public and media interest. A more detailed report appears in Section 2 on Page 26.

Organisation developments

The museum completed an organisational review which had been commissioned to ensure that we had the best possible staffing structure in place to take the museum into its second decade, and to support the priorities that I would like to emphasise during my term as director. These, broadly, are to enhance the quality and status of the collection, to raise the museum’s standing and recognition as a national institution, and to emphasise the quality of its intellectual products, in part by achieving a higher publishing profile. The management consultants reported that our three-branch structure was largely an effective one, and I have put in place some changes to help effect our goals.

Creation of the new Australian National Maritime Foundation to support the collection has been noted above. The Vaughan Evans Library, which has been a valuable research resource both for staff and the public since the museum’s inception, has been shifted from the Corporate Services branch into the Collections and Exhibitions branch. This in part reflects the importance of its growing collection of monographs and serials, which include rare and valuable works.

The section of the National Maritime Collection that presents the museum with one of its greatest challenges in future years, in terms of management and resources, is the fleet of historic vessels on the water. Recognising that this type of heritage item poses unique problems that are not encountered by most other kinds of collections, the museum is reviewing its fleet operations and priorities. The section that takes care of the vessels has been relocated into the executive arm while the review continues, where it reports through the office of the secretariat.

Reflecting the importance of temporary exhibitions, the USA Gallery and Indigenous affairs to the museum’s goals and strategies, these have been grouped in a special projects unit in the curatorial section of the Collections and Exhibitions branch.

The positions of manager of both temporary exhibitions and the USA Gallery have been upgraded. The creation of a permanent position of Indigenous curator and liaison officer has been noted above.

The museum’s public affairs section in the Commercial and Visitor Services branch was both a public relations unit and the coordinator of most museum publications including its website, many of which had their origins as promotional tools. In order to achieve a higher profile for both functions, they have been separated. Publishing remains within the Commercial and Visitor Services branch, while the new external relations unit reports directly to me. The staff position of sponsorship manager, which reports to the assistant director, Commercial and Visitor Services, was abolished and new strategies to address relations with the corporate sector, including outsourcing, are being examined.

Outlook

The financial year ahead will see substantial attractions in place, to help ensure healthy attendances and revenue. We will bring Ernest Shackleton’s famous vessel James Caird from England for our summer exhibition Antarctic Heroes, together with what we believe will be Australia’s largest display of Antarctic exploration to date. Saltwater – Yirrkala bark paintings of Sea Country will display all 80 works of the museum’s most important collection of sacred Aboriginal art. The USA Gallery’s Posters & Propaganda will examine this popular medium’s uses, from World War I to the war on terrorism. We’ll explore the menace, myth and majesty of the sea’s most feared predators in Shark – Predator and Prey – a must for Australian audiences.

Our latest international import will be the Portuguese maritime exhibition Siglas Poverias – Signs of fishermen, which we will tour to other museums as well. Education staff will build on the success of entertaining and educational museum theatrical performances with Bounty Recruits and The Mapmaker’s Brother. For children there will be an interactive program and exhibition of children’s book illustrations, Oceans of Stories.

Staff hope to install the world’s fastest watercraft, the jet-powered Spirit of Australia, as a centrepiece in the museum, and will undertake the first docking of the submarine HMAS Onslow. Over a longer time frame, we are confident that we will be able to determine if one of the shipwrecks being explored by the museum’s maritime archaeologists in annual dive seasons in the USA is James Cook’s Endeavour. This will have major implications for the museum’s profile.

Longer-term planning for our building needs in the future will continue as we develop our site master plan which aims to improve site usage and improve links between the museum and the Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre. The first component is a substantial redesign of the vessel display basin, to address wash problems which threaten the historic vessels moored there. These will be major capital works with very substantial implications for budgeting and strategic planning.

Staff are investigating and evaluating options for a new collection information management system (CIMS). At the time the museum was being developed it embraced computerised CIMS ahead of many longer-established organisations. The pace of information technology growth in the period has meant that the existing system is unable to deliver services now considered essential, including integration of photographic and other records and on-line access. This too has substantial budgeting and planning implications but will enhance access to collection data both by staff and external researchers.

Mary-Louise Williams, Director
Australian National Maritime Museum

TRAVELLING EXHIBITIONS

Smugglers – Customs & Contraband

One of the longest borders in the world was created when the Commonwealth of Australia was formed in 1901. Record drug busts, wildlife seizures and people smugglers have hit the headlines recently, highlighting the challenge of controlling who and what crosses this vast coastal frontier.

Sponsor: Australian Customs Service
Supported by the National Council for the Centenary of Federation.

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Curator Susan Sedgwick
Designer Exhibition Solutions

South Australian Maritime Museum
10 May 2001–29 July 2001
Visitors 9,234

Port of Echuca Authority
8 August 2001–6 November 2001
Visitors 28,315

Eden Killer Whale Museum
14 November 2001–3 February 2002
Visitors 12,710

Old Parliament House, Canberra
9 February 2002–1 May 2002
Visitors 15,160

VASA 1628 – Strange fate of a King’s warship

This exhibition, with objects and replicas from the outstanding Vasa Museum, Stockholm, tells of the tragic sinking of this royal warship, the pride of the Swedish fleet, in 1628. The magnificent Vasa, raised and reassembled in a spectacular feat of maritime archeology, is a treasure trove of art and information. The exhibition was created by ANMM in collaboration with Vasa Museum.

Sponsors: ASSA ABLOY Australia Pacific, Wallenius Wilhelmsen, Sas Scandinavian Airlines

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Curator Kieran Hosty
Designer Wendy Osmond & Natasha Galea

North & South Gallery
15 November 2001–28 January 2002
Visitors 98,780

Melbourne Museum
26 February 2002–28 April 2002
Visitors 41,920
 
 

eXHIBITIONS & MAJOR EVENTS

NOTE Visitor figures on pages represent the museum’s total visitor numbers during the time the attraction was at the museum (or to 30 June 2002). Visitors may not view all exhibitions.

Gold Rush! The Australian Experience

The gold rushes 150 years ago created links between Australia and California. Both experienced rapid growth in wealth and population, and far-reaching social changes.
The exhibition brought to life the gold fields, and the ships that carried gold-seekers.

Sponsored by The Australian Gold Council and Delta Gold.

Coordinator Paul Hundley
Curator Paul Hundley
Designer Peter Tonkin

USA Gallery
12 April 2001–7 July 2002
Visitors 273,381

Watermarks – adventure, sport, play

Unlike the temporary exhibitions on these pages, Watermarks – opened December 2001 in the ANZ Tall Gallery – is a long-term addition to the museum’s core exhibitions. More on page 6.

Sponsored by Blackmores Ltd, Spotless Services

Coordinator Denise Mackenzie
Curators Peter Emmett, Daina Fletcher, Penny Cuthbert, Megan Treharne, Michelle Linder
Designer X Squared Design

Armidale 42: Memory and Imagination

Japanese aircraft sank HMAS Armidale near Timor in 1942. Of the 140 men on board, 49 survivors spent nine horrific days in the water. Jan Senbergs’ extraordinary paintings and drawings dramatically evoke a lesser–known story of Australian heroism and suffering during the war in the Pacific.

A Bendigo Art Gallery travelling exhibition.

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Designer Lisa Carrington

Tasman Light
10 May 2001–15 July 2001
Visitors 13,668

Engineering Excellence Awards 2000

Innovative projects and processes across the spectrum of engineering, contributing to our quality of life.

Sponsored by the Institution of Engineers Australia, Sydney Division.

Coordinator Michelle Linder
Curator Michelle Linder
Designer Johanna Nettleton

Top Deck
6 January 2001–16 December 2001
Visitors 106,391

Australian Fishes – Illustrations by Walter Stackpool

Walter Stackpool created a unique record with his scientifically-accurate illustrations of Australian marine, estuarine and freshwater species that show us the familiar and unfamiliar fishes inhabiting our oceans and rivers. Not just an unsurpassed record of the anatomy of fish, but vibrant artworks in their own right.

Coordinator Susan Sedgwick
Curator Lindsey Shaw
Designers Irene Scortis & Daniel Ormella

South Gallery
14 July 2001–7 October 2001
Visitors 50,725

Stitches – Fare il Punto

Works by nine Italian Australian artists using the practice of stitching and domestic crafts to investigate the notion of 'being between cultures'. The diversity of migration experiences and changes and continuities in Italian cultural traditions were explored in the paintings, installations and photomedia.

Sponsored by Sirena, Instituto Italiano di Cultura, NSW Ministry for the Arts.

Coordinator Helen Trepa
Curator Illaria Vanni
Designer Daniel Ormella

North Gallery
18 August 2001–1 October 2001
Visitors 24,856

Celebrating 10 years – telling a maritime story

Over ten years our collection of objects has grown to show the diverse maritime stories of Australians and Australia’s relationship with its inland waterways and the sea. These portraits of people and ships were selected to represent exploration, commerce, immigration, leisure, Aboriginal culture and US connections.

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Curator Susan Sedgwick
Designer Lisa Carrington

Tasman Light
29 November 2001–3 March 2002
Visitors 114,762

HSC Aboriginal Studies student major works

Year 12 Aboriginal Studies HSC students display a diverse array of creative and challenging works including research papers, audio-visuals, artworks, textiles, books, poems, profiles of Aboriginal people and communities, performances and educational programs designed by students for students.

Coordinator John Waight

Wharf 7 Foyer
13 September–13 October 2001

Food at Sea Festival – Eating & Drinking with Sailors 1600–2000

Food for thought … and a lot of fun! The museum’s first Food at Sea Festival presented a lively program of entertaining activities, cooking demonstrations, dramatisations and an exhibition on food preservation, demonstrating that shipboard food has been an important factor in maritime history.

Sponsored by Sydney Institute TAFE NSDW, Novotel Darling Harbour, Royal Australian Navy, Broadwater Stoves.

Coordinator Bill Richards
Designer Johanna Nettleton

Museum wide
29 September 2001–28 October 2001
Visitors 19,125

PLAY: kids + water = fun

A hands-on exhibition with indoor and outdoor activities celebrating kids’ love for water, toys and games, in conjunction with the opening of our major new exhibition Watermarks. With a Kids Advisory Group from neighbouring schools, staff assembled a summertime frolic featuring bubbles and bodyboards, water squirters and sandcastles, boats and bathtime.

Sponsored by Zodiac Group, Sevylor Australia, Supersoaker, Kidisafe, Royal Lifesaving Society of Australia.

Coordinator Chris Waugh
Designers Suzan Weir, Irene Scortis & Johanna Nettleton

Nortel Network Gallery, North Wharf
3 December 2001–28 April 2002
Visitors 143,504

Banumbirr – Morning Star Poles

Banumbirr are sacred feathered poles used by Yolngu people of north-east Arnhemland in mortuary and memorial ceremonies. The tufts
of feathers represent the Morning Star, which journeys over the Sea Countries of northern Australia. The Banumbirr in this exhibition are from Elcho Island and represent the Dhuwa Moiety.

In association with Elcho Island Arts & Craft Centre and Bandingan Aboriginal Arts & Craft.

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Curator John Waight
Designers Susan Weir & Daniel Ormella

North Gallery
27 February–21 July 2002
Visitors 77,572

2002 Classic & Wooden Boat Festival

The popular festival returned after a two-year break, and featured a record 250 magnificent visiting vessels – work and recreational vessels, gleaming speedboats, dories and skiffs – at our wharves and on the hard. Crowds of 14,500 enjoyed live music, a giant maritime marketplace, traditional maritime crafts, films and talks, food and music, and fun for kids.

In association with Wooden Boat Association of NSW, major sponsors Woolwich Marina, Sydney Ports, Sydney Superyacht Centre.

Coordinator Di Fenton

All over the museum and Wharf 7
2–3 March 2002
Visitors 13,367

‘So lively … so easy’ – Under sail with Endeavour

Featured a rare drawing of James Cook’s Endeavour, made as the Whitby collier was refitted for the 1768–71 voyage and not displayed publicly for over 200 years. Also displayed was an important gift to the museum, prints of flora collected by Endeavour’s most famous passenger, Joseph Banks.

Coordinator Susan Sedgwick
Curator Martin Terry
Designer Lisa Carrington

Tasman Light
6 March 2002–23 June 2002
Visitors 62,953

Oceans Apart – the story of Ann & Matthew Flinders

The romantic side of Matthew Flinders is revealed through the exchange of love letters between the great navigator and explorer, and his wife Ann on the other side of the globe. This is a love story that spanned oceans and years. Separated only months after their marriage, it would be 10 years before Ann and Matthew were reunited – and then for only four short years.

Coordinator Susan Sedgwick
Curator Lindsey Shaw
Designers Irene Scortis & Natasha Galea

South Gallery
28 March 2002–24 November 2002
Visitors 94,721

Maritime Memorials

ANMM photographer Andrew Frolows captured the surprising diversity of public monuments to maritime affairs – shipwreck, discovery, war and even just the sea’s abundance.

Coordinator Mariea Fisher
Curator Kieran Hosty
Designer Lisa Carrington

Tasman Light
19 July 2001–25 November 2001
Visitors 73,618

Volvo Ocean Race Sydney stopover village

The museum provided a berthing and maintenance area for the visiting VO60 yachts of the world’s premier ocean race, while the organiser’s extensive Volvo Village in the park outside Wharf 7 was a mix of promotions, exhibitions, entertainment and activities.

Around the museum
1–26 December 2001

Alma Doepel

Melbourne tall ship Alma Doepel, a splendid three-masted topsail schooner, was built in 1903 on the north coast of New South Wales. She traded as a cargo vessel along the east coast of Australia, before serving since the 1970s as a sail training ship and museum vessel in Port Philip. In WWII she served as a troop carrier in New Guinea. Alma Doepel is currently based in Port Macquarie, her port of origin.

North Wharf
25–29 April 2002

James Craig

Restored with determination and huge effort
over the past two decades, Sydney Heritage Fleet’s magnificent 19th-century, iron-hulled, square-rigged barque James Craig – a pinnacle of sailing technology – moors at our Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre.

Visitors 53,524

Kijana

Jesse Martin, the youngest person to circumnavigate the globe solo and unassisted, launched his newest sailing project, The Journey of Kijana, at the museum.

South Wharf
15–24 March 2002

HMAV Bounty

On display at the museum’s North Wharf, this New Zealand-built replica of Bligh’s original HMAV Bounty was created for the feature film Mutiny on the Bounty, starring Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins. Visitors witnessed a major overhaul of the 18th-century style rigging.

North Wharf
From 1 June 2002
 


Section 2

Performance Reporting

KEY RESULT AREA 1 – SERVICE

‘provide high standards of service’
 
 

Strategic objectives

1.1 Deliver services which are strongly focused on the people we provide them for 1.2 Create service-oriented operational and cultural environments

Program Summary

Customer service

Customer service was enhanced by providing outstanding attractions detailed elsewhere; by capital works to improve visitor amenity and staff productivity; by enhancing revenue, minimising expenses and financial management; by human resource management; and by improvements to staff productivity through communications and information infrastructure. Performance indicators include revenue and visitor numbers, along with a global indicator ‘Interactions’ (table over page). This is a single outcome against expenditure which goes beyond the traditional gate count to tally additional ways in which the museum delivers services. The museum’s Customer Service Charter is at Appendix 21.

Visitor profile

In the previous financial year the museum’s visitation levels benefited greatly from the 2000 Sydney Olympics, as shown in the table of visitor figures over the page. This year visitation slightly exceeded targets, and closely followed last year’s patterns corrected for the Olympic period. During the year 43% of visitors came from the Sydney metropolitan area; 13% were from NSW regional and country areas; 11% came from other states, led by Victoria and Queensland. Visitors from overseas constituted 32%. Our top overseas markets were the UK, USA, New Zealand, Japan and Germany. Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates a 6% drop in overseas visitors to Australia since September 2001, with the US market plunging by 14%. US visitors to the museum certainly dropped in this period, but UK numbers increased while New Zealand and Japanese visitor numbers remained steady.

Focus on visitors

The museum’s front line of contact with visitors is the customer service section which administers front-of-house and security staff. Through the assistance of the volunteers program, a meet-and-greet position has been created to offer visitors extended customer service. Thirty volunteers have been trained to undertake this position. We increased the intake of work experience students to assist the demanding front-of-house area. Information sessions that brief the front-of-house and security staff on the content of new exhibitions ensure that visitor enquiries can be satisfied effectively.

Disability information sessions with the Australian Quadriplegic Association have now been incorporated into the customer services awareness program. OH&S and emergency awareness procedures have been augmented. These include increased first aid awareness, with additional in-house first-aid briefing sessions and first aid carry packs for responsive treatment. New security administration systems have been created and implemented, and electronic reporting has been introduced. The section manager has been appointed chairman of the ANMM Customer Service Task Force, and an assistant customer service manager position was created.

Capital works

Completing installation of the exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport, play in the ANZ Tall Gallery was the largest capital work for the year. It involved structural modifications to the visitor circulation structure and the engineering of substantial structures to support vessels on display. A repair system for the main building’s steel roofing panels was trialled, as water penetration has become an issue. Panels were lifted and a new sealing system was installed. After a trial period this system, if effective, will be applied to the entire roof. Upgrading of the Wharf 7 environmental control system was a priority, with installation of effective humidity controls and more directed air volume control in collection storage and working spaces. This major work was carefully staged to minimise disruption to working staff but had some impacts including construction noise, a period of reduced access to collection items and a down period for the conservation laboratory.

Venue hire and catering

The museum won the award for NSW Specialty Venue of the Year at the prestigious Meetings Industry Association of Australia Awards. This was the museum’s second award from the Meetings Industry Association, reflecting the staff’s success at marketing our facilities as venues for conferences, seminars and functions, to government, corporate and private clients. This commercial activity provides an important revenue stream for the museum and has a positive impact on its profile among clients. The museum works with the award-winning caterer The Mode Group, operator of our harbourside Yots Cafe which this year received a very good review in Good Living published by The Sydney Morning Herald.

The Store

Operations at the museum’s maritime gift and book store have expanded from its previous role as a retail outlet to include product development and a wholesale operation. The range of museum-branded and exhibition-related merchandise has been increased, while the wholesaling arm is creating a distribution network that will better serve the museum’s travelling exhibitions and provide a nationwide network for marketing the museum’s products and publications. The position of assistant manager was created to support the The Store’s expanding operations. A shutter system was installed to isolate The Store from the galleries to allow for extended trading periods after the museum doors shut, particularly during summer.

Sydney By Sail

This charter yacht fleet operating at the museum basin was a finalist in the year’s Telstra Small Business Award. This museum tenant offers a growing range of packages from a short sail to the Opera House for casual visitors, to catered overnight charters on Sydney’s famous harbour. As well as providing revenue to the museum, Sydney By Sail gives museum visitors the option of an active maritime experience to complement their visit to our maritime heritage precinct.

Communications and information

Section staff and contractors began the progressive replacement of the museum’s ageing multimedia technologies and infrastructure. With the major works associated with installation of the Watermarks exhibition, the PIVoD media and venue management system was installed. This programmable management and monitoring system for lights, power and other controllable devices allows us to turn on and shut down the whole venue, and stream audio, video and multimedia to display modules in the galleries. As this system is extended to other parts of the building and the navy ships outside, it will also provide feedback through security cameras and environmental sensors.

In the ANZ Theatre, used for film screenings as well as lectures and conferences for both museum programs and venue hirers, the old projection system was replaced by Sony VPL FE11 technology. A Sony VPL FX50 projection system was installed in the theatrette. IT enhancements included recabling the museum, replacing file servers and upgrading the file server operating system and firewall system. The Internet service, proxy cache, anti-virus and tape backup software were also upgraded.

Records management, part of the responsibilities of the communications and information section, classified and indexed 500 ship plans, created 1,151 files and expedited 7,924 file movements.

Human resource management

The museum worked with an occupational health and safety (OHS) consultant to undertake a range of initiatives. Development and implementation of policies and procedures continued. Staff attended training in general OHS awareness, OHS induction procedures for new staff and contractors, workplace inspections and accident investigations, and confined spaces issues. A third round of certified agreement negotiations commenced. An organisation and staffing review of the museum was completed and many of the recommendations implemented.
 
 

Visitors & interactions
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Visitors to the museum
428,343
464,188
314,243
Travelling exhibitions
238,762
72,627
107,200
Interactions  
1,141,649
1,197,476

Major visitor revenue sources
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Visitor entry revenue 
$2,274,049
$1,841,844
$1,700,980
The Store gross revenue
$605,153
$562,817
$526,541
The Store net revenue
$116,299
$42,419
$40,440
Yots Cafe rental revenue
$75,950
$79,747
$81,706

Venue hire performance
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Number of functions
389
308
239
Guests
49,435
*191,404
35,812
Turnover
$817,580
$675,229
$710,681
Net revenue
$536,598
$318,185
$374,698

 

Customer feedback
Visitors’ comments book
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Number of entries
1,051
231
1,305
Complimentary or positive
79%
60
85%
Neutral or indecipherable
5%
10
3%
Criticism/suggested improvements
16%
30
12%

 

Letters & emails
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Complaint
50
49
20
Complimentary 
252
261
57

Building services
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Budget
$1,331,000
$1,756,000
$1,626,000
Other
$671,529
$715,220
$579,794
Maintenance & minor works
$730,887
$636,637
$773,361
Energy costs
$323,886
$292,131
$272,845

 
 


KEY RESULT AREA 2 – PROGRAMS AND PRODUCTS

‘interpret Australia’s maritime past and present in exciting and informative ways’
 
 

Strategic objective

    1. Develop a wide range of stimulating programs and products
PROGRAM SUMMARY
 
 

Innovative maritime heritage programs

The year’s achievements in the areas of new exhibitions, festivals and visiting vessels appear in detail on pages 12–17, with further commentaries in the Director’s Overview. Planning ahead for temporary and visiting exhibitions and other attractions is a demanding, long-term process. The museum put into place an enhanced evaluation program for exhibitions and events (see page 37). The Collections & Exhibitions branch worked with other sectors of the museum to improve the ways in which it generates and reviews ideas for new exhibitions and events, to provide a more strategic approach to fulfilling the museum’s needs and to mesh more closely with landmark activities external to the organisation.

Appendix 1 provides details of the very diverse range of programs and products through which the museum communicates aspects of our maritime heritage, including lectures, tours, activities afloat, and many more. A number of museum events are collaborations with external organisations and individuals, which add further to the diversity of what’s on offer to our public. We worked for over two years with the organisers of the world’s best known round-the-world yacht race, who incorporated some of the museum’s sites and facilities into the Volvo Ocean Race Stopover Village which spread into Pyrmont Park as well. The eight VO60 yachts were mid-way in their year-long race around the world. Entering its second year at the museum was the Bloomsday celebration which in 2002 extended to a whole weekend. Organised by the James Joyce Foundation, it marks June 15, the day when the action of Joyce’s Ulysses takes place in the mind of its protagonist Leopold Bloom. Far more than just a literary event, it offered a host of creative talks and activities themed on Ulysses and Homer’s Odyssey, music and dance, food, and even a yacht race ending at the museum’s wharves.

Education and children’s programs

High demand for schools programs resulted in record numbers of visits by students and teachers. They included 42 sessions of the Year 12 chemistry workshop Shipwrecks & Salvage. The innovative gallery theatre program The Prospectors, which accompanied the exhibition Gold Rush! The Australian experience, was booked out by visiting school groups for three terms. The tables on pages 28–29 indicate the variety of programs on offer, and the responses to them. Forty-one percent of visiting schools took a tour led by trained teacher guides (up from 33% in 2000–2001), 26% participated in a workshop (up from 8.5%), and 48% of schools booked a vessel visit. Numbers were up, too, in the vacation care program.

As part of the celebrations for the museum’s10th birthday the education section offered a scholarship for a student aged 16–19 to make a sail-training voyage on the RAN brigantine Young Endeavour. The winner was Willow Sharp of Ferny Grove High School in Brisbane, who wrote a lively account of her voyage for the museum’s quarterly journal Signals.

The newest addition to the various weekend and holiday activities aimed at children and families is Mini Mariners. This weekly program for children five years and under and their parents/carers provides a stimulating environment encouraging creativity, investigation and exploration. It provides children with a positive introduction to the museum environment. Since the first session in May 2001, over 1,300 children have taken part in the program.

The USA Gallery

The USA Gallery is unique in the museum world as a gallery in a national museum funded by another nation. It explores a shared history – more than two centuries of maritime links between Australia and the United States – and is the result of a generous US endowment to the museum as a Bicentennial gift to Australia in 1988. The USA Gallery continued to provide benefits by enhancing diplomatic, business, cultural and social links between the two countries. The gallery often hosts fine US-sourced exhibitions due to its close institutional links with American museums. This year it showed two exhibitions developed here by its curator. Gold Rush! – The Australian experience marked the sesquicentenary of the Australian gold rushes. Patriotism, Persuasion, Propaganda – American War Posters attracted strong media interest with its mix of striking graphic art work and the topical inclusion of recent posters responding to the 11 September 2001 attacks on the USA. The gallery’s curator, a trained maritime archaeologist, led the ANMM team assisting the search for James Cook’s Endeavour in the USA (details follow).

Maritime archaeology

For a third year the museum sent a team of maritime archaeologists to advise and assist in a survey of 13 British transports scuttled in 1778 in Newport Harbour, Rhode Island, to blockade the port against an invading American and French fleet during the American War of Independence. One of them, according to research by the leader of the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project Dr Kathy Abbass, is James Cook’s Endeavour. Renamed Lord Sandwich, it had carried troops to North America and was among the scuttled transports.

During previous seasons’ work the team had confirmed that the project’s methodology was capable of identifying Endeavour if it was located. They identified one wreck as an 18th-century vessel of similar size and construction to three of the scuttled transports including Lord Sandwich aka Endeavour. This year the combined team undertook further excavation on this site, locating the remains of the keelson, stem post, ceiling planking, iron fastenings and treenails, floors, futtocks and the keel. These are being compared with the original plans of the Endeavour drawn up by the Deptford Dockyard in 1768. Further analysis of timbers and materials from the site will be needed before any identification can be made, along with more site surveys to rule out other wrecks. Dr Abbass has asked the museum to continue its involvement in the project and the museum is committed to further collaboration with RIMAP in this research, subject to the necessary funding support.

Indigenous affairs

With the creation of a new permanent position of Indigenous curator and liaison officer, collecting and development of exhibitions and programs relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities moved from the maritime communities curatorial section to a newly-created special projects unit.

Two major exhibitions were under development during the period, Banumbirr Morning Star Poles which went on display during the year and Saltwater Yirrkala bark paintings of Sea Country which opens in August 2002. The latter included development of a collaborative project between ANMM, Yirrkala community, the Australian National University and NSW Board of Studies, which will provide computer-based interpretation of the Saltwater bark painting collection both in the gallery and ultimately on the World Wide Web. Making its first appearance at the museum was a display of students’ selected major projects from the HSC Aboriginal Studies course, displayed at the Wharf 7 foyer.

The curator also provided consultation for an Indigenous component of the summer activity and exhibition Play – kids + water = fun, and assistance for the Mum Shirl exhibition at Boomali. The museum’s first Indigenous work experience student, from Bankstown High, was placed. The curator represented the museum at the fourth Indigenous Visual Arts Conference in Adelaide and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Awards in Darwin, and addressed the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority and other organisations on resources relating to Indigenous issues.
 
 

CURATORIAL SECTION

Totals of enquiries assisted
 
public/private
organisations
SECTION
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Technology
376
434
489
105
113
118
Communities
700
750
674
70
80
245
USA Gallery
85
60
126
98
107
109
Indigenous
-
-
20
-
-
60
TOTAL
1,161
1244
1,309
273
300
532

 

Project profile – temporary exhibitions (% staff time)
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
60
58
60
Communities
53
40
24
USA Gallery
35
60
50
Indigenous
50
TOTAL
148
158
184

 

Project profile – core exhibitions (% staff time)
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
8
20
21
Communities
42
55
56
USA Gallery
40
20
20
Indigenous
10
TOTAL
90
95
107

Project profile – public programs, media relations, outreach (% staff time)
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
18
12
10
Communities
5
5
5
USA Gallery
10
10
20
Indigenous
40
TOTAL
33
27
75

 

Project profile – maritime archaeology (% staff time)
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
14
10
9
USA Gallery
15
10
10

 

VISITORS PROGRAM SECTION

Education groups
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Primary schools
306
239
298
Secondary schools
226
167
236
Tertiary/Adult groups
120
83
70
GROUPS TOTAL
652
489
604

Visitor numbers
 
Primary students
16,091
11,096
16,944
Secondary students
9,553
6,939
6,432
Adult students
1,097
1,005
1,248
Teachers
3,709
2,807
3,488
Vacation care
3,332
2,234
2,950
Mini Mariners (new Program
N/A
N/A
1,152
Other groups
5,327
3,042
2,745
GROUPS TOTAL
38,269
27,090
34,959
Kids Deck
17,652
18,866
23,372
ALL PROGRAMS TOTAL
55,921
45,956
58,331

 
 
 

Workshops
 
2000–01
2001–02
Secrets of the Sea exhibition – games
2
2
Archaeology – Junior
7
6
Archaeology – Senior
4
8
Archaeology & Conservation workshop
N/A
2
Submarine Adventure
7
2
Phylum Fun
3
4
Ship Shape (James Craig)
5
19
Science and the Sea
2
4
Vasa / Science workshop
N/A
7
Shipwreck & Salvage workshop
N/A
52
Shipwreck Sleuths
N/A
1
Technology of Gold workshop
N/A
31
What is History workshop
N/A
2
TOTAL schools in workshops
34
140

 

Tours with Teacher Guides
 
2000–01
2001–02
Navigators gallery/early explorers
27
52 
Transport
8
39
The Sea
6
8
Vasa exhibition
N/A
13
General (includes History, ESL) – other tours
8
32
Gold Rush! exhibition tour and The Prospectors play 
58
79
TOTAL schools on tours
136
221

 

Cruises
 
2000–01
2001–02
General
12
15
Puzzling Cruise
5
0
Cruise and Pyrmont walk
8
8
TOTAL schools on cruises
25
23

 

Schools booked on visiting vessels
 
2000–01
2001–02
Batavia
198
N/A
Endeavour
26
N/A
Duyfken
27
N/A
James Craig (includes Ship Shape program)
10
32
TOTAL schools on visiting vessels
261
32

Other
 
   
2000–01
2001–02
Teacher Friends function, December
N/A
20
 
Teacher focus group: Navy
N/A
10
 
Teacher focus group: Oceans of Stories
N/A
10
 
Shipwreck & Salvage lecture –Yr 12 Students 
N/A
174
 
Food at Sea: special day, students
N/A
169
 
Food at Sea: Stopping the Rot, students
N/A
252
 
Aboriginal Studies HSC artwork event
N/A
150
 
Marine Careers Day for senior students 
520
450
 

 
 
 
 


KEY RESULT AREA 3 – MARITIME HERITAGE

‘foster the care and research of Australia’s
maritime heritage and material culture’
 
 

Strategic objectives

3.1 Develop and manage the National Maritime Collection

3.2 Manage other maritime historical material in our care and preserve traditional skills and pracitices

3.3 Encourage the preservation and research of maritime heritage and material culture Australia-wide and internationally

3.4 Make the National Maritime Collection and other maritime material accessible

PROGRAM SUMMARY

Acquisitions

A priceless assemblage of Australian boatbuilding heritage known as the Lars & Harold Halvorsen Collection was donated to the museum by Harvey Halvorsen, the son and grandson of these designer-shipwrights, at a function that included a sail-past of classic Halvorsen motor yachts courtesy of the Halvorsen Owners Club. The Norwegian family of boatbuilders, which migrated to Australia in 1924, built some 1,200 vessels here. Best-known were their beautifully-proportioned timber cabin cruisers and luxurious motor yachts now owned by celebrities, media stars and a former Prime Minister. They built Australia’s first America’s Cup challenger Gretel (1962) and designed and built noted Sydney–Hobart winners such as Freya, Saga, Peer Gynt and Solveig. Over 230 Halvorsen work boats served Australian, US and Dutch forces in the Pacific theatre of World War II. Armed Halvorsen cruisers hunted and sunk a Japanese midget submarine attacking Sydney Harbour 50 years ago. The collection is a lasting record of this work in the form of meticulously kept boat plans and photographs, along with other records and boatbuilding tools. The donor, Harvey Halvorsen, is a boatbuilder continuing the family traditions.

A collection of shipping memorabilia from the Howard Smith shipping company was another significant donation to the collection during the year. It included a bridge telescope from SS Edina, an engraved ship’s bell in a stand, an oil painting of SS Bombala, a blueprint of TSS Mourilyan, prints, photographs, certificates, company ephemera and memorabilia. The material relates to an existing collection of Howard Smith ship models, paintings, photographs, and memorabilia acquired earlier.

Appendix 2 is a selection of purchases for the collection this year, and Appendix 3 fully details donations to the collection.

Fleet section

Docking, maintenance and display of the museum’s fleet of historical vessels in the water was the major focus for the engineers, shipwrights and ship keepers of the fleet section this year. The work, programmed to ensure maximum exposure for the fleet at our Darling Harbour wharves, saw nine vessels slipped. Maintenance activities were also carried out afloat. Fleet staff led Members tours of the below-decks areas of the museum’s destroyer Vampire. They also ensured that the early-20th-century Victorian ’couta fishing boat Thistle flew the flag for the museum when they sailed her in both the Balmain Regatta and the Gaffers Day Regatta on Sydney Harbour.

A milestone for the period was the return to display of the Broome pearling lugger John Louis following the most extensive program of conservation work carried out on any of the museum’s fleet to date. John Louis represents both tradition and change in the Western Australian pearl fishery. The section worked closely with the Australian War Memorial, which owns the World War II commando raider Krait displayed at our wharves, to undertake some planking repairs during the vessel’s slipping. Krait at our wharves was again the location for a commemorative service on Remembrance Day, 11 November, for members and families of the Z Special Units Association.

Continuing the museum’s commitment to provide training in traditional and specialised boat building and repair skills, Immanuel Ariel was engaged as a shipwright apprentice. He is the eighth young person (all males to date) to undertake part or all of an apprenticeship at the museum. The museum works with an accredited training provider, the Hunter Valley Training Company, and provides the apprentice’s wage while the company provides administrative, liaison and support services for the apprentices.

Conservation

A major project for the museum’s conservation section this year was the assessment and treatment of the 80 bark paintings of the Saltwater collection from Yirrkala in north-eastern Arnhem Land, to prepare them for display at the museum in August 2002. This will be the first time that the entire collection, which documents the land and sea rights claims of Yolngu people, has been displayed at the museum. The collection was purchased in 2000 with the assistance of Stephen Grant and Bridget Pirrie, GrantPirrie Gallery.

Bark painting is limited geographically to wooded Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory and part of the Kimberley Region of Western Australia. The paintings on stringybark, in pigments of black, white and red to yellow ochres, are part of the artist’s natural environment. As such they are not two-dimensional works like paintings on canvas or paper, but are more like three-dimensional sculptures. They are flexible and move with fluctuations in the environment. The conservation section undertook the complete refit and strengthening of the complex aluminium mounting systems which support the barks yet are flexible enough to move with them in changing environmental conditions. This has made the barks ready for further travel, as plans are underway to display them elsewhere in Australia and overseas.

Vaughan Evans Library

The library is named after its founding donor, the widely respected amateur maritime historian the late Vaughan Evans OAM, who donated his large personal library of monographs and serials to form the collection’s core. This year proved to be a busy one for library staff with increased usage by museum staff working on a busy exhibition program, and by the public. This trend is one that has continued since the library opened (four years before the museum itself opened to the public). The trend has only ever been halted by the Olympic year where a slight dip in figures resulted. Greater use is being made of the library’s pages on the museum’s web site http://www.anmm.gov.au/libhome.htm, which include a number of frequently consulted research aids and indexes to ship images, and contact from the public by email has increased. People visiting the library in person to conduct research also increased. Revenue from enquiries rose and the number of ‘thank you’ letters also increased, a reflection of the improvements in service that have been made since the appointment of a public enquiries librarian.

Outreach activities for the year included several tours of our facilities for family history groups. The library also participated in the study tour program for university & TAFE students of Library and Information Science.

The library received accreditation from the Australian Government Locator Service (AGLS) for metadata which was added to the museum’s web site to improve accessibility. This is in line with the Commonwealth Government’s on-line requirements for government agencies. Library staff developed new on-line resource guides for our Pathfinder series, to enhance the web site at http://www.anmm.gov.au/lib/subject.htm. A collaborative project with maritime author Graeme Andrews led to several new Pathfinder titles on ports, river trade working craft and ferries. A Pathfinder resource guide for HSC chemistry students studying shipwrecks was produced in association with the museum’s maritime archaeology program, and the NSW Heritage Office. This was formulated to cater as well for the needs of remote students with no access to a large research or university library, and complements the museum’s conservation workshops for school students.

The continued participation by a small and dedicated team of Vaughan Evans Library
volunteers enabled several new indexing projects to be started, while good progress was made with existing projects.
 
 

Acquisitions to National Maritime Collection
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
48
19
51
Communities
84
50
51
USA Gallery
18
4
18
Indigenous
0
0
0
TOTAL
150
73
120

 

Donations to National Maritime Collection
 
SECTION
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
23
7
27
Communities
51
32
32
USA Gallery
2
0
0
Indigenous
0
0
0
TOTAL
76
39
59

 

Acquisition funding – by appropriation
 
Section
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Technology
$51,164
$37,742
$54, 380
Communities
$290,075
$167,903
$134,170
USA Gallery
0
0
0
Indigenous
0
0
0
Total
$341,239
$205,645
$188,550

 
 
 

Acquisition Funding – by trust fund
 
Section
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Technology
0
0
0
Communities
0
0
0
USA Gallery
$106,050
$32,409
$14,500
Indigenous
0
0
0
TOTAL
$106,050
$32,409
$14,500

 

Objects registered
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Documents
414
180
24
Art
118
398
62
Books
27
32
9
Clothing and accessories
95
124
103
Photographs
61
91
95
Tools and equipment
295
151
743
Models and model parts
0
12
17
Vessels, vessel parts and accessories
8
101
40
Other 
125
72
416

Registration
 
 
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Objects registered (NMC)
1,143
1,161
1,469
Collections registered 
172
110
78
Collections remaining unregistered
119
95
124
Objects on display in core exhibitions (NMC, loans) 
2,196
1,616
1,924
Objects on temporary display
495
779
442
Objects borrowed
250
625
397
Objects loaned (includes ANMM travelling exhibitions)
26
95
137
Institutions borrowing from NMC
7
18
7
Core exhibition objects changed over (NMC, loans)
35
0
99
Collections donated
55
39
59
Registration photographs
1,143
1,161
1,469
Other photographic services
270
405
450

 
 
 

Conservation
 
 
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
Conservation hours (preparation, 
examination, treatments)
5,001
5,614
5,817
Preventative Conservation hours
1,050
885
950
Collection objects examined, treated
770
925
820
Loan objects examined, treated
854
823
842
Special Project hours
450
343
65
Public enquiries serviced
55
39
45
       

 

Fleet projects profile (% staff time)
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Maintenance
75
80
62
General tasks/shipkeeping*
10
7
24
Routine vessel operations
8
5
9
Special events (vessels)
2
5
5
Other
5
3
nil

*Change in categories from 2001–02 to reflect current work patterns

Vaughan Evans Library
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Monographs/AV titles accessioned
762
699
716
Internal loans processed
1,369
1,480
1,998
Inter-library loans processed
228
243
326
Public research requests/usage
2,991
2,775
3946
Items catalogued
775
815
861
Revenue
$2,290
$2,661
$4,065

 
 


KEY RESULT AREA 4 – PROFILE AND IMAGE

‘be acknowledged as a pre-eminent and innovative
cultural institution’
 
 

Strategic objectives

4.1 Increase awareness of what the museum is and does

4.2 Extend and enhance the museum’s corporate, government and
community support
 
 

PROGRAM SUMMARY
 
 
Awareness and support

Increased awareness of and support for the museum grows from activities across every branch. It depends on close collaborations between staff undertaking the museum’s core activities – developing programs and products that attract attention for their quality and relevance – and staff who promote them to diverse markets and audiences. Programs such as The Welcome Wall raise the museum’s profile among the many migrant cultures that constitute modern Australia. Key groups whose support is essential to the museum’s work include corporate and individual benefactors, Members and volunteers.

Marketing and media

Marketing the museum is undertaken using two broad strategies. One focuses on exhibitions and events as specific incentives for audiences to attend. The other promotes the museum and its facilities as a rewarding place to visit for both Sydneysiders and tourists. Marketing staff utilised a variety of direct advertising media, selected for specific markets which vary according to the nature of the new museum attractions being promoted. Joint promotions with other attractions and tourism groups were tracked through incentive coupon campaigns, allowing more accurate and effective targeting of the marketing budget.

The newly-created external relations unit had a year that was outstanding for the amount of media exposure generated by new attractions at the museum, in particular the Watermarks exhibition and the first Food at Sea Festival. The major newspapers have carried substantial feature articles on these and other museum activities, including the national newspaper The Australian’s colour weekend magazine which featured Watermarks as the cover story on the Australia Day long weekend.

Market research

From March a market researcher was contracted for a year to undertake analysis of various aspects of the museum’s attractions and services, to help make these products more closely aligned to market needs and expectations. An exit survey of the 2002 Classic & Wooden Boat Festival was conducted. A tracking study of visitors to two temporary exhibitions, Oceans Apart and Banumbirr – Morning Star Poles examined visitor flow, to improve future exhibitions’ floorplan layout and placement of major labels. A face-to-face study was undertaken to assist selection of the title for a future major temporary exhibition. Evaluation of the audio guides provided for visitors to the museum’s ex-RAN destroyer and submarine included both visitor responses and feedback from volunteer guides stationed on these two popular attractions.

Publications

Print and electronic publications such as the web site http://www.anmm.gov.au support the museum’s profile and image and take it to international audiences (see Appendix 4). Enhancing the Members program’s presence on the web site and raising the number of Member services available on-line was given priority. An email Members newsletter was under development. The publications section administers a growing demand for reproductions of ship images from the collection.

Corporate support

Sponsors continued to provide valuable financial support, products and services for our programs. The travel and shipping industries have assisted the museum’s many exhibition programs, particularly those drawing on overseas collections. Support for the National Maritime Collection’s acquisitions this year is detailed in the previous section, Key Result Area 3. Corporate sponsors are acknowledged in Appendix 10. Appendix 11 lists Corporate Members, an allied program administered by the Members manager. The establishment of a Foundation to support museum activities, principally to build a fund for major additions to the National Maritime Collection, is detailed in the Director’s Overview on page 7.

Members

In conjunction with the museum’s 10th anniversary we launched the HMAS Sydney model appeal, a Members project to raise funds to build models of HMAS Sydney II, III & IV. These will join an existing model of HMAS Sydney I in the Navy exhibition when it is redesigned next year. The Members’ 10th anniversary luncheon was a gala affair, featuring as its guest speaker the Australian author Blanche d’Alpuget who related her childhood experiences growing up on Sydney Harbour and sailing with her father, the noted yachtsman and yachting historian Lou d’Alpuget. Visits by Members and their guests to the museum totalled 19,640. There were 976 new members enrolled during the year, and the rate of membership renewals rose to 74%. Corporate memberships rose to 37. The inaugural sponsor of the Members program, Cunard, reached the end of its 10-year contract and new sponsorships are being sought.

Volunteers

The museum’s 10th birthday celebrations included the first issue of the 10-year gold volunteer service badge to 35 volunteers. Volunteers help deliver the museum’s services in many ways, working in most museum sections as the table opposite shows. They are essential to help manage crowds at major events such as the Classic & Wooden Boat Festival and our free-admission Australia Day celebrations when visitor numbers peak. At 30 June 2002 the museum had 367 registered volunteers, up 9.2% for the same time last year. Volunteers contributed 41,180 hours during the year. This is 1,677 hours less than for the same period last year (which included the Olympic period) but 17.7% above the museum’s target of 35,000 hours.

Volunteer guides have led a total of 3,383 Vampire tours, escorting 28,333 visitors, up 19.8% from last year. General museum guides have conducted 2,288 tours, escorting 10,392 visitors, up 35.3% from last year. The Cape Bowling Green Lighthouse/Fleet had 229 visitors on 46 guided tours. The lighthouse has been closed for most of the year for restoration works. Guided tours of Wharf 7 were attended by 1,483 visitors on 470 separate tours.

The volunteers section manages student applications for work experiences, liaising with section managers to find appropriate placements if resources allow. There were 20 applications from secondary school students, 14 of whom were placed. Fifteen applications from tertiary and college students resulted in nine placements.

At 30 June 2002, volunteers have contributed 279,677 hours since the museum’s inception. Valued at $12 per hour this equates to services worth $3.36 million dollars.

The Welcome Wall

In May the 10,000th registrant on the Welcome Wall was unveiled by the NSW Governor, Professor Marie Bashir, along with another 850 new names, watched by 1,500 guests. It was the second unveiling of names during the year, the previous one featuring as guest speaker the Australian author Thomas Keneally. The Welcome Wall is a tribute to the six million people who have migrated from across the seas to make a new home in Australia. The museum launched The Welcome Wall in November 1997 with the support of its principal sponsor Optus, which saw the project’s focus on Australia’s cultural diversity as one that complemented its own corporate goals as a leading multicultural organisation. This year Optus encouraged its staff to participate in The Welcome Wall by submitting their own stories about the experiences of themselves or family members in migrating to Australia, to win their own place on The Welcome Wall.
 
 

Advertising & market research
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Advertising agency 
$108,254
$102,926
$108,043
Market research organisations
$55,974
$25,897
$33,513
Direct mail
$1,291
$300
$2,711

 

Sponsorship performance
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Cash
$499,340
$314,800
$454,817
Kind
$208,960
$72,250
$119,610
Total
$710,300
$387,050
$574,427

Members program
 
 
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
Memberships at 30 June 2001
3,999
3,956
3,717
Members at 30 June 2001
11,485
11,222
10,220
Percentage renewing
80
69
74
Corporate Memberships
35
36
37
Gross revenue
$301,345
$322,125
$294,702
Net revenue 
$196,627
$180,119
$170,533
Exclusive Members functions held
63
67
53
Members attending functions
3,811
3,550
2,748

 

Volunteers service profile (% of service time)
 
1999–00
2000–2001
2001–02
Guides
65.6
63.5
59.2
Fleet
9.0
10.7
13.9
Members
8.4
8.6
8.7
Others*
6.0
8.2
6.8
Public programs
2.6
2.7
4.4
Volunteer office
2.1
1.7
1.0
Conservation
1.7
1.2
2.0
Registration
1.2
1.5
1.8
Marketing/External relations
1.0
1.6
2.2
Curatorial
0.0
0.2
0.0

*Includes Library, Records, Design and Secretariat and miscellaneous task hours.
 
 
 


Section 3

Financial Statements
 

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

For the year ended 30 June 2002
 
   
Notes
 
2002

$’000

 
2001

$’000

           
Revenues from ordinary activities           
  Revenues from Government
3A
 
29,461
 
28,435
  Sales of goods and services
3B
 
4,759
 
7,284
  Interest
3C
 
253
 
421
  Net gains from sales of assets
3D
 
18
 
23
  Other
3E
 
1,640
 
1,373
Total revenues from ordinary activities    
36,131
 
37,536
           
Expenses from ordinary activities

(excluding borrowing costs expense)

         
  Employees
4A
 
7,553
 
7,852
  Suppliers
4B
 
9,464
 
9,526
  Grants
4C
 
38
 
28
  Depreciation and amortisation
4D
 
6,274
 
6,811
  Write-down of assets
4E
 
24
 
116
             
Total expenses from ordinary activities

(excluding borrowing costs expense)

     

23,353
 
24,333
           
Borrowing costs expense
5
 
1,164
 
1,241
           
Net operating surplus from ordinary activities    
11,614
 
11,962
             
  Gain on extraordinary item
6
 
-
 
50,174
             
Net surplus    
11,614
 
62,136
             
Net surplus attributable to the Commonwealth
12
 
11,614
 
62,136
             
Net credit to asset revaluation reserve    
4,713
 
7,285
Total revenues, expenses and valuation adjustments attributable to the Commonwealth and recognised directly in equity      

4,713

   

7,285

Total changes in equity other than those resulting from transactions with owners as owners    
16,327
 
69,421
             

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
 
 

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

as at 30 June 2002
 
   
Notes
 
2002

$’000

 
2001

$’000

ASSETS          
Financial assets          
  Cash
7A
 
7,546
 
4,133
  Receivables
7B
 
412
 
638
  Investments
7A
 
806
 
767
Total financial assets    
8,764
 
5,538
           
Non-financial assets          
  Land and buildings
8A
 
76,666
 
76,672
  Infrastructure, plant and equipment
8B
 
20,461
 
17,453
  National Maritime Collection
8C
 
8,646
 
8,472
  Inventories
8E
 
103
 
95
  Other
8F
 
239
 
546
Total non-financial assets    
106,115
 
103,238
Total assets    
114,879
 
108,776
           
LIABILITIES          
Interest bearing liabilities          
  Loans
9A
 
17,815
 
18,937
Total interest bearing liabilities    
17,815
 
18,937
Provisions          
  Employees 
10A
 
1,852
 
2,073
  Capital Use Charge    
292
 
19
Total provisions    
2,144
 
2,092
             
Payables          
  Suppliers
11A
 
1,135
 
1,150
  Deposits
11B
 
88
 
202
  Other    
-
 
21
Total payables    
1,223
 
1,373
             
Total liabilities    
21,182
 
22,402
           
NET ASSETS    
93,697
 
86,374
EQUITY          
  Contributed equity
12
 
1,000
 
1,000
  Reserves
12
 
25,198
 
20,485
  Accumulated surplus 
12
 
67,499
 
64,889
Total equity    
93,697
 
86,374
           
             
Current assets    
8,959
 
6,179
Non-current assets    
105,920
 
102,597
Current liabilities    
3,705
 
3,763
Non-current liabilities    
17,477
 
18,639

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
 
 

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

for the year ended 30 June 2002
 
   
Notes
 
2002

$’000

 
2001

$’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES          
Cash received          
  Appropriations    
29,461
 
28,435
  Sales of goods and services    
5,104
 
5,943
  Interest    
270
 
390
  GST received from ATO    
824
 
618
  Other    
621
 
608
  Contribution from Patrons Fund    
386
 
-
Total cash received    
36,666
 
35,994
Cash used          
  Grants    
(38)
 
(28)
  Employees    
(7,039)
 
(6,507)
  Suppliers    
(9,972)
 
(10,383)
  Borrowing costs    
(1,178)
 
(1,252)
Total cash used    
(18,227)
 
(18,170)
Net cash from operating activities
14
 
18,439
 
17,824
INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
Cash received          
  Proceeds from sales of property, plant & equipment    
42
 
33
Total cash received    
42
 
33
Cash used          
  Purchase of property, plant and equipment    
(4,642)
 
 

(4,523)

  Purchase of intangible assets    
(147)
 
-
Total cash used    
(4,789)
 
(4,523)
Net cash (used by) investing activities    
(4,747)
 
(4,490)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
Cash used          
  Repayment of debt    
(1,122)
 
(948)
  Capital use charge paid    
(9,118)
 
(9,607)
Total cash used    
(10,240)
 
(10,555)
Net cash (used by) financing activities    
(10,240)
 
(10,555)
Net increase in cash held    
3,452
 
2,779
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period    
4,900
 
2,121
Cash at the end of the reporting period
7A
 
8,352
 
4,900

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Australian National Maritime Museum
SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS

as at 30 June 2002
 
       
2002

$’000

 
2001

$’000

BY TYPE          
           
COMMITMENTS          
  Operating leases    
187
 
100
Total commitments payable    
187
 
100
COMMITMENTS RECEIVABLE (1)  
7,230
 
7,682
 

Net commitments

   
7,043
 
7,582
BY MATURITY          
All net commitments          
  One year or less    
925
 
880
  From one to five years    
4,756
 
4,214
  Over five years    
1,362
 
2,488
Net commitments    
7,043
 
7,582
Operating lease commitments          
  One year or less    
175
 
85
  From one to five years    
12
 
15
Net operating lease commitments    
187
 
100

N.B: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

(1) Commitments receivable under the sublease of Level 3, Wharf 7.

(2) Operating lease include leases for maintenance and storage facilities and for a motor vehicle, on which there are no contingent rentals.
 
 

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
 
 
 
 

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENCIES

as at 30 June 2002
 
       
2002

$’000

 
2001

$’000

CONTINGENT LOSSES    
-
 
-
Total contingent losses    
-
 
-
CONTINGENT GAINS    
-
 
-
Net contingencies    
-
 
-

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
 
 
 
 
 
 

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2002
 
   
Note Description
   
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
2 Economic Dependency
3 Operating Revenues
4 Operating Expenses
5 Borrowing Cost Expenses
6 Extraordinary Item
7 Financial Assets 
8 Non-Financial Assets 
9 Interest Bearing Liabilities
10 Provisions 
11 Payables
12 Equity
13 Non- Cash Financing and Investing Activities
14 Cash Flow Reconciliation
15 Remuneration of Council Members
16 Related Party Disclosures
17 Remuneration of Auditors
18 Average Staffing Levels
19 Financial Instruments
20 Appropriations
21 Assets Held in Trust
22

23

Reporting of Outcomes

Australian National Maritime Foundation

   

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Basis of Accounting

The financial statements are required by clause 1(b) of Schedule 1 of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 and are a general purpose financial report.

The statements have been prepared in accordance with:

The statements have been prepared having regard to:


The Statements of Financial Performance and Financial Position have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets which, as noted, are at valuation. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

Assets and liabilities are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. Assets and liabilities arising under agreements equally proportionately unperformed are however not recognised unless required by an Accounting Standard. Liabilities and assets which, are unrecognised, are reported in the Schedule of Commitments and the Schedule of Contingencies.

Revenues and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance when and only when the flow or consumption or loss of economic benefit has occurred and can be reliably measured.

Consolidation and associated company. The financial statements show information for the economic entity only; this reflects the consolidated results for the parent entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum, and its wholly owned subsidiary, The Australian National Maritime Foundation. The results of the parent entity do not differ materially from the economic entity and have therefore not been separately disclosed. The Australian National Maritime Foundation is a company limited by guarantee, with an initial contribution of $385,620.

The assets, liabilities and results of The Australian National Maritime Foundation have been consolidated with the parent entity accounts in accordance with AAS24 – Consolidated Financial Reports. All internal transactions and balances have been eliminated on consolidation.
 
 

1.2 Changes in Accounting Policies

The accounting policies used in the preparation of these financial statements are consistent with those used in 2000-2001.

1.3 Reporting by Outcomes

A comparison of Budget and Actual figures by outcome specified in the Appropriation Acts relevant to the Museum is presented in Note 22. Any intra-government costs included in the figure ‘net cost to Budget outcomes’ are eliminated in calculating the actual budget outcome for the Government overall.

1.4 Revenue

The revenues described in this Note are revenues relating to the core operating activities of the Museum.

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers.

Interest revenue is recognised on a proportional basis taking into account the interest rates applicable to the financial assets.

Revenue from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts. The stage of completion is determined according to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Revenues from Government - Output Appropriations

The full amount of the appropriation for departmental outputs for the year is recognised as revenue.

Resources Received Free of Charge

Services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of the resources is recognised as an expense.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition.

1.5 Employee Entitlements

Leave

The liability for employee entitlements includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as it is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The liability for annual leave reflects the value of total annual leave entitlements of all employees at 30 June 2002 and is recognised at its nominal amount.

The non-current portion of the liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2002. In determining the present value of the liability, the Museum has taken into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

Employees contribute to the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme and Public Sector Superannuation Scheme. Employer contributions amounting to $462,899 (2000-01: $455,162) in relation to these schemes have been expensed in these financial statements.

No liability for superannuation benefits is recognised as at 30 June as the employer contributions fully extinguish the accruing liability, which is assumed by the Commonwealth.

Employer Productivity Superannuation Contributions totalled $168,842 (2000-01: $170,981).

1.6 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases, which effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets, and operating leases, under which the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. The Museum has no finance leases.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a basis that is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.7 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.8 Grants

The Museum recognises grant liabilities as follows.

Most grant agreements require the grantee to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. In these cases, liabilities are recognised only to the extent that the services required have been performed or the eligibility criteria have been satisfied by the grantee.

In cases where grant agreements are made without conditions to be monitored, liabilities are recognised on signing of the agreement.

1.9 Cash

Cash means notes and coins held and any deposits held at call with a bank or financial institution.
 
 

1.10 Financial Instruments

Accounting policies in relation to financial instruments are disclosed in Note 19.

1.11 Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken.

1.12 Property (Land, Buildings and Infrastructure), Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Revaluations

Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment are revalued progressively in accordance with the ‘deprival’ method of valuation in successive three-year cycles, so that no asset has a value greater than three years old.

The Museum completed its asset revaluation on 30 June 2002, with asset groups updated as follows:

Assets in each class acquired after the commencement of a progressive revaluation cycle are not captured by the progressive revaluation then in progress.

In accordance with the deprival methodology, land is measured at its current market buying price. Property (other than land), plant and equipment are measured at their depreciated replacement cost. Where assets are held which would not be replaced or are surplus to requirements, measurement is at net realisable value. At 30 June 2002, there were no assets in this situation.

The revaluation in 2002 was conducted by the Australian Valuation Office.

Recoverable Amount test

Schedule 1 requires the application of the recoverable amount test to the Museum’s non-current assets in accordance with AAS 10 Recoverable Amount of Non-Current Assets. The carrying amounts of these non-current assets have been reviewed to determine whether they are in excess of their recoverable amounts. In assessing recoverable amounts, the relevant cash flows have been discounted to their present value.

Depreciation and Amortisation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Museum using, in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation/amortisation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each balance date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate. Residual values are re-estimated for a change in prices only when assets are revalued.

Depreciation and amortisation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:
 
2001-02 2000-01
Buildings  22 years 22 years
Leasehold land  105 years 105 years
Leasehold improvements Lease term or 10 years Lease term or 10 years
Permanent exhibition items 7 - 20 years 7 – 20 years
Infrastructure, plant and equipment 5% - 33% 5% - 33%

The Collection is not depreciated because of its long term nature and the expected appreciation of its historical value.

The aggregate amount of depreciation allowed for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in Note 4D.

1.13 Inventories

Inventories held for resale by the Museum store are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Inventories not held for resale are valued at cost, unless they are no longer required, in which case they are valued at net realisable value.

1.14 Taxation

The Museum is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and goods and services tax.

1.15. Capital Usage Charge

A capital usage charge of 11% (2000-01:12%) is imposed by the Government on the net assets of the Museum. The charge is adjusted to take account of asset gifts and revaluation increments during the year.

1.16 Foreign Currency

Transactions denominated in a foreign currency are converted at the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. Foreign currency receivables and payables (if any) are translated at the exchange rates current as at balance date.

1.17 Insurance

The Museum has insured for risks through the Government’s insurable risk managed fund, called ‘Comcover’. Workers compensation is insured through Comcare Australia.

1.18 Comparative Figures

Comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation in these financial statements where required.

    1. Rounding
Amounts are rounded to the nearest $1,000 except in relation to:

2. ECONOMIC DEPENDENCY

The Australian National Maritime Museum is controlled by the Commonwealth of Australia.

The Museum is dependent on appropriations from the Parliament of the Commonwealth for its continued existence and ability to carry out its normal activities.
 
 

3. OPERATING REVENUES $’000 $’000
 
 

3A. Revenues from Government
 
Appropriations for outputs
29,461
28,435

 

3B. Sales of goods and services
 
Goods 304 ---------- ----------
540
569
Services
4,219
6,715
 
4,759
7,284
Cost of sales of goods  

280
304

 

3C. Interest
 
Deposits 
253
421

3D. Net Gain from Sales of Assets
 
Infrastructure, plant and equipment    
  Proceeds from sale
41
33
  Less: Net book value at sale
(23)
(10)
Net gain
18
23

3E. Other Revenues
 
Industry contributions
510
387
Other- Donations and bequests
974
841
Grants
15
145
Other
141
-
 
1,640
1,373

Donations include $964,610 (2000-01: $806,546) for service-related donations-in-kind from a range of donors.

Certain refurbishments to the Museum’s exhibits have been recorded for the first time this year using deprival valuation methodology and have been recorded as Other revenue. The total amount involved is $141,296 (2000-01: nil).
 
 

4. OPERATING EXPENSES

4A. Employee Expenses
 
Remuneration (for services provided)
6,021
6,466
Redundancy and separation

Other employee expenses

53

1,479

-

1,386

 
7,553
7,852

The Museum contributes to the Commonwealth Superannuation (CSS) and the Public Sector Superannuation (PSS) schemes which provide retirement, death and disability benefits to employees. Contributions to the schemes are at rates calculated to cover existing and emerging obligations. Current contribution rates are 17.6% of salary (CSS) and 10.8% (PSS). An additional 3% is contributed for Employer Productivity Superannuation Contributions.

4B. Supplier Expenses
 
Supply of goods and services
9,271
9,344
Operating lease rentals
193
182
 
9,464
9,526

 

4C. Grants Expense

The Museum makes grants to support the involvement of community groups in maritime heritage projects.
 
Non-profit institutions
38
28

4D. Depreciation and Amortisation
 
Depreciation of property, plant and equipment
5,224
5,911
Amortisation of leasehold assets
982
848
Amortisation of capitalised interest
68
52
 
6,274
6,811
     
The aggregate amounts of depreciation or amortisation expensed during the reporting period, for each class of depreciable asset are as follows:
Buildings 
3,217
3,062
Leasehold improvements
20
43
Capitalised interest
68
52
Infrastructure, plant and equipment
2,969
3,654
 
6,274
6,811
     
4E. Write-Down of Assets    
Plant & equipment – write-off on disposal
24
116
 
24
116

5. BORROWING COST EXPENSE
 
Loan
1,164
1,241

 
 
 

6. EXTRAORDINARY ITEM

The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia transferred the ownership of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s museum and exhibition centre building at Darling Harbour to the Museum, at its net book value ($50,174 m) at the time of transfer, 1 July 2000.

7. FINANCIAL ASSETS
 
7A. Cash and Investments

Cash at bank and on hand 680 6,620

Deposits at call

846

6,700

933

3,200

Total cash
7,546
4,133
Cash investments – bank bills  

806
767
Total investments
806
767
Balance of cash as at 30 June shown in the Statement of Cash Flows
8,352
4,900
     
7B. Receivables
Goods and services 
101
238
Receivable from Trust
21
-
GST receivable
290
400
Total receivables
412
638
     
Receivables (gross) are aged as follows:    
Not overdue
356
400
Overdue by:    
Less than 30 days
1
93
30 to 60 days 
3
3
60 to 90 days
-
142
more than 90 days
52
-
 
56
238
 
412
638

 

8. NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

8A. Land and Buildings
 
     
Leasehold land – at 2000-01 valuation 
10,500
10,500
Accumulated amortisation
(108)
-
Total leasehold land
10,392
10,500
     
Buildings – at cost

Building – at 2000-01 valuation

56,525

17,000

51,479

17,000

Accumulated depreciation
(7,323)
(2,397)
 
66,202
66,082
     

 
 
Leasehold improvements - at cost

Leasehold improvements - at 2001-02 valuation 213 -

15

113

11

-

Leasehold improvements – at 1998-99 valuation
-
199
Accumulated Amortisation
(56)
(121)
 
72
89
     
Total buildings (net)
66,274
66,172
Total Land and Buildings
76,666
76,672
 

8B. Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment
 
     
Plant and equipment - at cost 506 2,571
-
1,237
Accumulated depreciation
-
(500)
 
-
737
     
Plant and equipment – at 2001-02 valuation 
2,743
-
Plant and equipment – at 1998-99 valuation
-
1,462
Accumulated depreciation
(1,393)
(1,241)
 
1,350
221
     
Exhibits and fitout – at cost
0
5,720
Accumulated depreciation
0
(951)
 
0
4,769
     
Exhibits and fitout - at 2001-02 valuation 31,521
36,455
-
Exhibits and fitout – at 1998-99 valuation
-
31,302
Accumulated depreciation
(17,344)
(19,576)
 
19,111
11,726
     
Total Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment
20,461
17,453

The revaluations were completed by independent valuers at the Australian Valuation Office.

8C. National Maritime Collection
 
National Maritime Collection - at cost
358
184
National Maritime Collection - at valuation (1999-2000)
8,288
8,288
 
8,646
8,472

The revaluation of the National Maritime Collection in 1999-2000, was in accordance with the revaluation policies stated in Note 1 and was at Director’s valuation.

8D. Analysis of Property, Plant and Equipment

TABLE A Movement summary 2001-02 for all assets irrespective of valuation basis
 
Item
Land
Buildings
Total Land & Buildings
Infrastructure, Plant & Equipment
National Maritime Collection
Total
 
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
Gross value as at 1 July 2001
10,500
68,689
79,189
39,720
8,472
127,381
Additions: purchase of assets
-
838
838
3,628
174
4,640
Revaluations: write-ups/(write-downs)
-
15
15
3,662
-
3,677
Assets transferred in/(out)
-
4,111
4,111
(4,111)
-
-
Disposals
-
-
-
(3,701)
-
(3,701)
Gross value as at 30 June 2002
10,500
73,653
84,153
39,198
8,646
131,997
Accumulated Depreciation/Amortisation as at 1 July 2001
-
2,517
2,517
22,267
-
24,784
Disposals      
(3,625)
 
(3,625)
Depreciation/amortisation charge for the year
108
3,197
3,305
2,969
-
6,274
Revaluations: write-ups/(write-downs)
-
(19)
(19)
(1,190)
-
(1,209)
Assets transferred in/(out)
-
1,684
1684
(1,684)
-
-
Accumulated Depreciation/Amortisation at 30 June 2002
108
7,379
7,487
18,737
-
26,224
Net book value as at 30 June 2002
10,392
66,274
76,666
20,461
8,646
105,773
Net book value as at 1 July 2001
10,500
66,172
76,672
17,453
8,472
102,597

TABLE B Summary of balances of assets at valuation as at 30 June 2002
 
Item Land Buildings Total Land & Buildings Infrastructure, Plant & Equipment National Maritime Collection Total
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
$’000s
As at 30 June 2002            
Gross value
10,5000
17,000
27,500
39,198
8,288
74,986
Accumulated Depreciation/Amortisation
(108)
(843)
(951)
(18,737)
-
(19,688)
Net book value
10,392
16,157
26,549
20,461
8,288
55,298
As at 30 June 2001            
Gross value
10,5000
17,000
27,500
32,764
8,288
68,552
Accumulated Depreciation/Amortisation
-
-
-
(20,817)
-
(20,817)
Net book value
10,500
17,000
27,500
11,947
8,288
47,735

8E. Inventory $’000 $’000
 
Store inventory held for resale – at cost
103
95

8F. Other non-financial assets
 
Prepayments
239
546

 

9. INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
 

9A. Loans
 
Bill of exchange
17,815
18,937

The Museum has an external loan of $17,815,431 (2001: $18,937,766) which financed the construction of the Wharf 7 building.

The loan is held with the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. The Museum has no other debt facilities.

The loan is due to be repaid in July 2010 and is payable as follows:
 
Within one year: 675
1,305
1,123
Within one to two years
1,503
1,305
Within two to five years:
5,859
5,167
More than five years
9,148
11,342
Total loans
17,815
18,937

 

10. PROVISIONS

10A. Employees
 
Salaries and wages 101 70 
158
152
Bonus
-
267
Leave
1,694
1,654
Aggregate employee entitlement liability
1,852
2,073

Employee provisions are categorised as follows:
 
  Current
937
1,248
  Non-current
915
825
   
1,852
2,073

 

11. PAYABLES

11A. Suppliers
 
Trade creditors 990 855
1,135
1,150

All supplier payables are current.



11B. Deposits


 
Advance revenue – Venue hire
88
89
Advance revenue – Other
-
113
Total deposits repayable
88
202

 

12. EQUITY
 
Item

 

Capital

 

Accumulated Results
Asset Revaluation Reserve
TOTAL EQUITY
 
2002
2001
2002
2001
2002
2001
2002
2001
 
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Balance 1 July

Operating result 

Net revaluation increases

Contribution from Patrons Fund

Capital Use Charge

1,000

-

-

-

-

1,000

-

-

-

-

64,889

11,614
 
 

386

(9,390)

12,379

62,136

-

-

(9,626)

20,485

-

4,713

-

-

13,200

-

7,285

-

-

86,374

11,614

4,713

386

(9,390)

26,579

62,136

7,285

-

(9,626)

Balance 30 June
1,000
1,000
67,499
64,889
25,198
20,485
93,697
86,374

 

13. NON-CASH FINANCING AND INVESTING ACTIVITIES
 
Non-cash financing and investing activities
-
50,174

The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia transferred the ownership of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s museum and exhibition centre building at Darling Harbour to the Museum, at its net book value at the time of transfer, 1 July 2000.
 
 

14. CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

Reconciliation of operating surplus to net cash from operating activities:
 
Net operating surplus from ordinary activities
11,614
11,962
Depreciation and amortisation 1,943 2,693
6,274
6,811
Assets taken up
(141)
-
Write down of non-current assets
5
93
(Increase)/decrease in receivables
205
(247)
(Increase)/decrease in inventories
(8)
(21)
(Increase)/decrease in other assets
453
(506)
Increase/(decrease) in employee provisions
(221)
611
Increase/(decrease) in liability to suppliers, 
deposits and accrued interest
(128)
(879)
Contribution from Patrons Fund
386
 
Net cash from operating activities
18,439
17,824

 
 
 

15. REMUNERATION OF COUNCIL MEMBERS

The number of Council members of the Museum included in these figures are shown below in the relevant remuneration bands
 
$ Nil - $10,000 9 10
4
7
$10,001 - $20,000
5
4
$20,001 - $30,000  
1
$170,001 - $180,000
1
1
     
 
10
13

$ $
 
Aggregate amount of superannuation payments in connection 19,428 19,833
with the retirement of Council members
975
1,930
Other remuneration received or due and receivable by Council 194,754 193,066
members of the Museum
261,517
264,152
Total remuneration received or due and receivable by Council 214,182 212,899
members of the Museum
262,492
266,082

 

16. RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

Council Members of the Museum during the year were:

Mr Mark Bethwaite (Chairman)

Ms Mary-Louise Williams (Director)
Mr John Kirby (deceased 8 April 2002)
Mr Richard Bunting

Ms Cecilia Caffery (retired 8 December 2001)

Mr Bruce McDonald

Mr John Farrell

Mr Noel Robins

RADM Kevin Scarce RAN

Mr Marcus Blackmore

Mr John Simpson

Mr Brian Gibson (appointed 26 June 2002)

Ms Eda Ritchie (appointed 26 June 2002)

Ms Nerolie Withnall (appointed 26 June 2002)

The aggregate remuneration of Council Members is disclosed in Note 15.
 
 

17. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS
 
Remuneration to the Auditor-General for auditing 36,000 38,000
the financial statements
34,000
34,000

No other services were provided by the Auditor-General during the reporting period.
 
 
 
 
 
 

  1. AVERAGE STAFFING LEVELS
2002 2001
 
The average staffing levels for the Museum during the year were
100
101

 

19. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

19. a) Terms, Conditions and Accounting policies
 
Financial Instrument Notes Accounting Policies and Methods (including recognition criteria and measurement basis) Nature of underlying instrument (including significant terms and conditions affecting the amount, timing and certainty of cash flows)
Financial Assets Financial assets are recognised when control over future economic benefits is established and the amount of the benefit can be reliably measured.
Deposits at call and cash on hand 7A Deposits are recognised at their nominal amounts. Interest is credited to revenue as it accrues. Temporarily surplus funds, mainly from monthly drawdowns of appropriation, are placed on deposit at call with the ANZ Bank. Interest is earned on the daily balance at the prevailing daily rate for money at call and is paid monthly.
Bank bills 7A The bills are recognised at cost. Interest is accrued as it is earned.  The bills are funds with the ANZ Bank, in 30 day accounts. Interest is earned at the prevailing rate and is paid monthly.
Receivables for goods and services 7B Receivables are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any provision for bad and doubtful debts. Provision is made when collection of the debt is judged to be unlikely.  Credit terms are net 30 days (2000-01: 30 days)
Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities are recognised when a present obligation to another party is entered into and the amount of the liability can be reliably measured.
Bills of exchange 9A Bills are carried at the amount of their initial proceeds plus accrued interest. Bills are issued at a discount reflecting market yields. They have an average maturity of 90 days and an effective interest rate of 6.9%. The bills will be fully repaid in July 2010.
Trade Creditors 11A Trade creditors are recognised at their nominal amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Settlement is usually made net 30 days (2000-01: 30 days)
Refundable Deposits 11B Deposits for advance services are recognised at their nominal amounts.  Service revenue is recognised as it is earned, at the date the service is provided.

19. b) Financial Instruments: Interest Rate Risk
 
Financial Notes Floating Fixed Interest Rate Non-Interest  Total Weighted Avg Effective
Instrument   Interest Rate 1 year or less 1 - 5 years > 5 years Bearing   Interest Rate
    01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

$’000

00-01

$’000

01-02

%

00-01

%

Financial Assets
Cash deposits and cash on hand 7A
846
933
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
846
933
2.95
3.21
Bank bills and deposits at call 7A
6,700
3,200
806
767
-
-
-
-
-
-
7,506
3,967
4.5
5.34
Receivables for goods and services 7B
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
412
638
412
638
n/a
n/a
Total financial assets recognised
7,546
4,133
806
767
-
-
-
-
412
638
8,764
5,538
   
Total Assets
114,879
108,776
 
Financial Liabilities
Bills of exchange 9A
-
-
-
-
-
-
17,815
18,937
-
-
17,815
18,937
6.9
6.9
Trade creditors 11A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,135
1,150
1,135
1,150
n/a
n/a
Deposits 11B
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
88
202
88
202
n/a
n/a
Other payable  
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
21
-
21
n/a
n/a
Total financial liabilities recognised
-
-
-
-
-
-
17,815
18,937
1,223
1,373
19,038
20,310
   
Total Liabilities
21,182
22,402  
Unrecognised Instruments          
Other commitments Schedule of Commitments - - - - - - - - 7,230
7,682
7.230
7,682 n/a n/a
Total financial assets (Unrecognised)
7,230
7,682
7,230
7,682    
Other commitments Schedule of Commitments - - - - - - - -
187
100
187
100 n/a n/a
Total financial liabilities (Unrecognised)
187
100
187
100  

19. Financial Instruments

19. c) Net Fair Values of Financial Assets and Liabilities
 

 
 

Financial Assets


 
 

Note

2001-02
2000-01
Total carrying amount Aggregate net fair value Total carrying amount Aggregate net fair value
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash  7A
7,546
7,546
4,133
4,133
Investments 7A
806
806
767
767
Receivables  7B
412
412
638
638
Total Financial Assets
8,764
8,764
5,538
5,538
Financial Liabilities (Recognised)
Bank loan/Bill of exchange 9A
17,815
18,456
18,937
19,932
Trade creditors 11A
1,135
1,135
1,150
1,150
Repayable deposits  11B
88
88
202
202
Other payable  
-
-
21
21
Total Financial Liabilities (Recognised)
19,038
19,679
20,310
21,305

Financial Assets

The net fair values of cash, deposits on call and receivables approximate their carrying amounts.

The net fair values of bank bills are based on discounted cash flows using current interest rates for assets with similar risk profiles.
 

Financial Liabilities

The net fair value of trade creditors are approximated by their carrying amounts. The net fair value of the bills of exchange, which will be rolled over after 90 day maturity periods for up to 8 years to finance the long-term loan, are based on discounted cash flows using current interest rates for liabilities with similar risk profiles.

d) Credit Risk Exposures

The Museum’s maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Financial Position.

The Museum has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk. All figures for credit risk referred to do not take into account the value of any collateral or other security.

20. APPROPRIATIONS

The Museum received the following appropriations during the year out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund:
 
 
$’000
$’000
Annual Appropriation Bill No 1 – Basic Appropriation
29,461
28,435

 

21. ASSETS HELD IN TRUST

The Museum has established a number of Trust accounts which are detailed below. Donations and bequests are received for specified purposes under formal trust arrangements. Moneys received are placed in a special bank account and expended on the specified projects in accordance with the terms of the trusts. These moneys are not available for other purposes of the Museum and are not recognised in the financial statements.

a) USA Bicentennial Gift Fund

In December 1987 a gift of US$5 million was received to develop and maintain the USA Gallery at the Museum. Upon completion of the fitout the assets were transferred to the Museum. The financial position of the Fund is as follows:

2002 2001
 
Opening balance at 1 July 3,709 3,854
3,828,807
3,857,180 x
Receipts: Interest
78,349
191,322
Tax Credits
35,221
-
Exhibitions
7,664
34,792
 
3,950,041
4,083,294
     
Less payments:    
Acquisitions
14,356
32,409
Other expenses
109,712
211,159
     
Increase/(decrease) in value of Managed Fund
(417,523)
(10,919)
     
Closing balance at 30 June
3,408,450
3,828,807
     
Represented by:    
Managed Funds
3,389,708
3,790,895
Interest Receivable
25,164
16,829
Tax credits receivable
14,862
-
Liability to Museum
(21,284)
21,083
 
3,408,450
3,828,807

The USA Gallery funds are deposited into a long-term investment with Merrill Lynch Mercury Wholesale Balanced Fund. Ongoing operational expenses are financed from interest payable from this Fund.

b) NZ Bicentennial Gift Fund

A fund was created to research and develop educational material and undertake maintenance relating to the yacht Akarana. The financial position of the Fund is as follows:
 
Opening balance at 1 July 27 26
43,682
41,358
Receipts: Interest
2,095
2,324
Closing balance at 30 June
45,777
43,682
     
Represented by    
Bank deposit
45,777
43,647
Interest receivable
-
35
 
45,777
43,682

c) Patrons Fund

This fund was created by the Council as part of the Museum’s Sponsorship Policy and in June 2001, the balance of the funds were transferred to the Australian National Maritime Foundation. The financial position of the Fund is as follows:
 
Opening balance at 1 July 330 336
-
365,401
Receipts: Interest received
-
20,219
Transfer to Australian National Maritime Foundation
-
(385,620)
Closing balance at 30 June
-
-
     
Represented by:    
Bank deposit
-
-
Interest Receivable
-
-
 
-
-

 

d) Louis Vuitton Fund

In November 1988 Louis Vuitton Pty Ltd donated $30,000 to set up the Louis Vuitton Collection for the acquisition of material relating to the early French exploration voyages to the Pacific, as well as later maritime association between France and Australia. The financial position of the Fund is as follows:
 
Opening balance at 1 July 
12,107
11,444
Receipts: Interest
581
664
 
12,688
12,107
     
Represented by:    
Bank deposit
12,688
12,097
Interest Receivable
-
10
 
12,688
12,107

 

22. REPORTING OF OUTCOMES

Outcomes of the Museum

The Museum is structured to meet one outcome, being increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s relationship with its waterways and the sea.

Only one Output Group is identified for the Outcome.
 
 
Actual
Budget
$000
$000
Net cost of entity outputs
17,824
20,248
Net Cost to Budget Outcome
17,824
20,248

 

  1. The Australian National Maritime Foundation
The Australian National Maritime Foundation, a Company Limited by Guarantee was established in December 2000 and is controlled by the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum. Funds in the amount of $385,620 were transferred to the Foundation from the Patrons Fund. There was no activity in the Foundation during the year ending 2000- 2001.

The Foundation’s objects are to create a capital fund, through gifts, bequests and fund-raising activities, for the purposes of:

The financial position of the Foundation is as follows:
 
 
2002
2001
     
Opening balance at 1 July
-
-
Receipts:

Interest

7,224
-
Donations
5,000
-
Sales of goods and services
1,300
-
Contribution from Patrons Fund
385,620
-
 
399,144
 
Less payments:     
Suppliers
36,468
-
     
Closing balance at 30 June
362,676
-
     
Represented by:    
Cash at bank 
359,338
-
Receivables
3,338
-
 
362,676
-


Section 4

Appendixes

APPENDIX 1 Visitor & Members programs

Seminars

Cruise Forums – a special series of on-the-water seminars exploring human impact on the fragile environment of Sydney Harbour and the Parramatta River, with expert lecturers and water tours of the sites under discussion. The two following sessions appeared this financial year:

15/07/01: Fish & Fishing – the seafood nation with Dr Dave Pollard & Dr Gary Henry, NSW Fisheries

12/8/01: Parramatta River – a river reborn, with James Carey, Parramatta Council and John McClymont, historian

08/08/01: Gold Rush: The Australian Experience, illustrated talk and tour of the exhibition, in conjunction with the WEA

10/10/01: Food Afloat – victualling at sea, seminar with Antonia MacArthur, historian, Ray Young, submarine coxswain, and a P&O representative, and viewing of exhibition Stopping the Rot, in conjunction with the WEA

21/10/01: VASA 1628: Strange fate of a King’s warship, guided exhibition tour and seminar by Dr Philip Edwards, Sydney University, and Kieran Hosty, ANMM curator and maritime archaeologist, in conjunction with the WEA

08/05/02: Oceans ApartAnn and Matthew Flinders, guided tour and seminar by Emeritus Professor Brian Fletcher and Lindsey Shaw, ANMM senior curator, in conjunction with the WEA

Lectures and talks

07/07/01: ‘Gold rush Australia – celebrating the 150th anniversary’, Members lecture by Geoff Hocking, author of To the Diggings

05/08/01: ‘Lucinda – Little ship of state’, Members lecture by Patricia Miles, ANMM curator of economic & commercial history

08/08/01: Illustrated talk ‘The gold rushes of 19th-century California’ by Paul Hundley, ANMM senior curator, USA Gallery

19/08/01: ‘Aussies on Titanic!’ Members lecture by Andrew Rogers, first Australian tourist to view Titanic wreck

14,16/11/01: VASA 1628, Members preview with Urban Skenback, head of exhibitions and senior curator of Sweden’s Vasa Museum

18/11/01: ‘The loss of HMAS Sydney II: Will we ever know why?’ Members lecture by Dr Tom Frame, leading naval historian and author of the best-selling HMAS Sydney: Loss & Controversy

07/02/02: ‘Alaskan highlights’, Members lecture by Michelle Durant, ANMM volunteers assistant

16/02/02: ‘Sea raiders 1914’, Members talk by Dr David Stevens, director of naval studies, Canberra, and film viewing of HMAS Sydney–Emden naval battle

27/03/02: Oceans Apart, Flinders exhibition preview and illustrated talk by Lindsey Shaw, ANMM senior curator and Sarah McCormick, registrar NMM Greenwich, for Members

04/05/02: ‘Voyage of their life’, Members lecture on the 1948 voyage of SS Derna by Diane Armstrong, a passenger and researcher of the ship’s history

18/05/02: ‘Flinders’ love letters’, an illustrated Members talk on Flinder’s character and personal life by Lindsey Shaw, ANMM senior curator

30/06/02: ‘Oskar Speck – a maritime odyssey’, an illustrated Members talk on the German adventurer Oskar Speck by Penny Cuthbert, ANMM curator of sport and leisure

Tours

04/08/01: Members walking tour of contemporary Sydney & the Maritime Services Building with Eoghan Lewis, architect

11/08/01: Members walking tour of Camperdown cemetery, Dunbar graves

25/08/01: Members walking tour of St Thomas cemetery with Leonie Masson, senior librarian, Historical Services

31/08/01: Members walking tour of historic Glebe with Maureen Fry

29/09/01: Members walking tour of Middle Head Forts, the ‘tiger cages’ of Sydney

07/11/01: Members tour of HMAS Vampire engine rooms with Steven Adams, ANMM fleet manager

11/11/01: Members walking tour of historic Naremburn with Paul Storm, historian, & Scott Robertson, architect

19/01/02: Members walking tour of St James Railway with Railway Historical Society

24/02/02: Members maritime city walk

05/04/02: Members tour of the Brett Whiteley Studio, Surry Hills

10/04/02: Members tour of the Vaughan Evans Library and Sydney Heritage Fleet Library

21/04/02: Members walking tour of the architectural legacy of 19th-century Randwick

27/04/02: Members walking tour of restored mansion Clyde Bank

03,04/05/02: Members behind-the-scenes tour of Government House

24/04/02: Heritage Week tour and special viewing of exhibition Oceans ApartThe story of Ann & Matthew Flinders

11/05/02: Members walking tour of Sydney’s central railway

On the water

01/08/01: Members ferry tour to Spectacle Island

13,14/09/01: Members ferry trip and tour of Cockatoo Island

10/11/01: Members ‘Harbour battlefield – Anniversary tour’ of 1942 Japanese submarine attack on Sydney Harbour

15/11/01: Members jacaranda cruise aboard heritage ferry Lithgow

26/12/01: Members cruise, Sydney to Hobart yacht race start

26/01/02: Members Australia Day cruise, Sydney by Sail

26/01/02: Members Australia Day picnic party

02/02/02: Members sail aboard brigantine Windeward Bound

02/03/02: Members sunset cruise aboard brigantine Windeward Bound

03/03/02: Members sunset cruise aboard brigantine Windeward Bound

03/03/02: Members cruise aboard heritage ferry Proclaim in the Classic Ferry Challenge

09/03/02: Members cruise aboard James Craig

30/03/02: Members Sydney ferry tour of Cockatoo Island

13/04/02: Members autumn leaves cruise aboard heritage ferry Lithgow

14/04/02: Members tour of Fort Denison

01/06/02: Members ‘Harbour battlefield – Anniversary tour’ of 1942 Japanese submarine Sydney Harbour attack

Children’s programs

01–22/07/01: Kids Space Port – activity centre featuring dress-ups and craft themed on the Smugglers – Customs & Contraband 1901 to 2001 exhibition

01/07–31/08/01: Musical mayhem – Mini Mariners with a musical theme

28/07–30/09/01: Gold Rush! – Kids Deck activities themed on the exhibition Gold Rush! The Australian Experience

01–31/08/01: Special exhibition film series – quality documentaries related to current exhibitions Gold Rush! The Australian Experience and Follow the Sun

01/09/01: Buccaneers & buried treasure – Mini Mariners pirate fun with stories, songs and dress-ups

30/11/01: Around the world in a boat – Mini Mariners visit a different country each week, with stories, songs, dress-ups and boat making

20/10–02/12/01: Maritime mementos – Kids Deck activities based on the museum’s tiny tugboat called Albert

01/12/01–03/03/02: Bubbling with bubbles – Mini Mariners song, stories, bubble blowing

27/12/01–25/01/02: Wetworld – a wet fun centre for kids and their families

08/12/01–28/04/02: The PLAY Backyard – creative activities for kids using bubbles and water

01–31/03/02: Bathtime – Mini Mariners fun with tales of Mr Archimedes’ bath and bath toy activities

09/03–07/04/02: Conan the Bubbleman – the beauty and magic of bubbles revealed in this special show for kids

01–28/04/02: Water toys workshop – Kids Deck activities

05,12/04/02: Rain, rain, rain – Mini Mariners, songs and stories about rain

13–28/04/02: The PLAY Backyard activity zone – creative activities for kids using bubbles and water

28/04/02: Big wet ideas competition – children’s drawing, writing, modelling competition

01–28/04/02: Bubble Fun – creative activities using bubbles for kids aged 2–10

01–31/05/02: Trim the cat – Mini Mariners explore the story of Matthew Flinders and his cat Trim, mask and puppet-making

04–26/05/02: Adventures with Flinders – dress-ups and more in association with the exhibition about Matthew Flinders

Theatre programs

07–22/07/01: The Prospectors family theatre themed on the Gold Rush! exhibition

29/09/01: Sub Grub family theatre themed on the daily life of a submarine chef

27/12/01–25/01/02 & 13–28/04/02: Splash Happy Circus Show linked to PLAY: kids + water = fun exhibition

Other public and members programs

01/07/01: Tours in song – tours of museum exhibitions with related shanties and sea-songs

02/07/01: Members viewing of exhibition By Water at the Museum of Sydney, with curator John Stringer

22/07/01: Super storytelling – a family afternoon performed by leading members of the Australian Storytelling Guild

01–31/08/01: Special exhibition film series – quality documentaries related to current exhibitions Gold Rush! The Australian Experience and Follow the Sun

29/08/01: New Members welcome reception

17/10/01: Launch of Member’s 10th Birthday Appeal – HMAS Sydney models

04/11/01: Ceremony to unveil 1,000 new names on The Welcome Wall, the museum’s tribute to the six million migrants who have journeyed to Australia. Guest of honour Thomas Keneally

24/11/01: Members 10th birthday anniversary luncheon, speaker Blanche d’Alpuget

01–2/12/01: Swedish weekend – with live bands, folk dancing and special performances

09/12/01: Members Christmas shopping night

27/01/02: The Warship Vasa – a special film related to the exhibition VASA 1628 – Strange fate of a King’s warship

22/02/02: Members official opening of exhibition Banumbirr – Morning Star Poles

02–03/03/02: Classic & Wooden Boat Festival returns to our wharves

12/03/02: New Members welcome reception

05/04/02: Ceremony to unveil 850 new names on The Welcome Wall, the museum’s tribute to the six million migrants who have journeyed to Australia. Guest of honour NSW Governor, Professor Marie Bashir

19/04/02: Special Members viewing of the Sydney by Ferry exhibition at the Museum of Sydney

15–16/06/02: Bloomsday 2002 – a festival on the harbour presented by the James Joyce Foundation and featuring celebrity readings from Homer’s Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses; Ulysses Challenge Yacht Race; Bob Ellis’ limerick competition; children’s activities; film screenings; music, food and drink

Programs for visiting schools

06/01–05/02: The Prospectors – theatre performance for years 5–6 dramatising life in the goldfields and located in the exhibition Gold Rush! The Australian Experience

01–18/07/01: Smugglers Tales – the incredible stories of the smuggler squad, students years 2–4 participate in action-packed stories and tour the Smugglers exhibition

01–18/07/01: Who’s a Smuggler? – a presentation of hypothetical scenarios to students years 5–10, involving smuggling and environmental dilemmas

01–02/12/01: VASA 1628 poster competition – winning entries displayed in the Peter Doyle Learning Centre

28/02–21/07/02: Banumbirr Morning Star Poles – an exhibition recommended for History, Geography and Aboriginal Studies students

05–07/02: Shipwreck and Salvage workshop – year 12 Chemistry, talks by conservators, examination of objects, experiments, with museum tour

01/07/01–30/08/02: James Craig tall ship – links with transport and gold rush themes years 2–12 and the Ship Shape program highlighting life on board a working tall ship

01/07/01–30/08/02: Shipwreck Sleuths – scientific principles used to identify origin of salvaged artefacts, analysis of materials, tour of restored barque James Craig, suitable for years 7–10

01/07/01–30/08/02: Science and the Sea – scientific principles relating to a maritime environment: buoyancy, corrosion, navigation, communication, explorers and science, suitable for years 5–8

01/07/01–30/08/02: Creative Conservation – self-guided tours looking at nature and the practice of science, for years 7–10

01/07/01–30/08/02: Harbour Cruises for Schools on board a heritage ferry, years 7–10

01/07/01–30/08/02: Puzzling Cruises for Schools – on board a heritage ferry, years 4–8
 
 

APPENDIX 2 Selected acquisitions

Artworks & prints

Painting, oil on board, by John Alcott, 1925
Depicting Pinchgut Island in the central foreground and a tugboat to the right. The ships of the United States Navy are shown at Garden Island in the background. The American fleet, consisting of the battleship California and seven other vessels, entered Sydney Harbour on 23 July 1925. USA Bicentennial Gift Fund purchase.

Oil painting of Orion by Frank Norton, 1936
The painting was presented to the owner of the Orion Cinema in Campsie, Sydney, by the Commander and officers of RMS Orion. The painting hung in the cinema’s foyer for up to 40 years. It was purchased from the owner’s daughter Mrs Doris McCormac.

Lithograph of the wreck of the barque Despatch, 1939
This vessel departed Sydney bound for London on 8 March 1839 with passengers and a cargo of wool. The cargo caught fire on 11 March off Lord Howe Island. Passengers and crew took to the ship’s boats and safety while the Despatch burned to the waterline.

Technical drawings of RAN badges, about 1965
These linen drawings feature gouache coloured painted badges and specifications for the official crests of the Oberon submarines HMAS Orion and Onslow and the official Royal Australian Navy badge. Gift from Maintenance Engineering Services Naval Support.

Framed poster for the Bobby Brown Memorial Surfing Contest
Bobby Brown was one of a group of young surfers who challenged Midge Farrelly’s surfing supremacy in the 1960s. He reached the final of the 1964 world championships at Manly but never competed overseas, preferring to surf for his own enjoyment. He shaped boards for Brian Jackson until his death in a pub brawl at Taren Point in 1967. A surf contest was held in his memory.

Drawing and text for cartoon strips by Steve Cakebread 2000/2001
Framed pen, watercolour and and Pantone marker drawing and text for cartoon strip Olympic Felch, 2000/2001. Framed gouache and pen drawing and text on plastic cell for cartoon strip Gonad Man (episode 5, ‘Goes to Hawaii’). Both represent modern surfing culture and were exhibited as part of Tubular Cells Exhibition in 2001 at Silicon Pulp Animation Gallery, Sydney. They were acquired for the exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport & play.

Three prints after Ferdinand Bauer by Nokomis Publications, 2002
Featuring the red-flowered silky oak, blue pincushion and Burdekin plum, these prints have been selected to represent the natural history aspect of the voyage of Matthew Flinders around Australia 1801–03. Ferdinand Bauer was the natural history artist on the expedition. The originals are held in the Natural History Museum, London and have been reproduced under licence. Purchased from Nokomis Publications.

Photographs

Photograph of HMAS Parramatta (I), 1910
This ship was part of the First Fleet Unit – the first ships of the Royal Australian Navy. It was the first to arrive in Australia having been constructed in England. This photograph shows officers and crew on arrival in Fremantle, Western Australia, in 1910. Gift from Roby Tidswell.

Silver gelatin photograph by David Moore ‘Surfboat competing at surf carnival Curl Curl 1960’
Taken by David Moore as part of the Portrait of a Nation series commissioned by the American Time-Life group in 1960.

Five photographs by Jon Lewis from the Bondi Series, 1984–88
Adagio dancers 1984, Odd flippers 1984, Boy with hairtail 1984, Retired beach inspector 1985, Beach Buddha 1988. Silver gelatin prints, selium-toned on archival, fibre-based paper and signed, dated and titled on the back by the artist.

Two diptych photographs from exhibition The Seventh Wave, 2000
Two untitled silver gelatin diptych photographs by Trent Parke and Narelle Autio, produced as part of the exhibition and book called The Seventh Wave. One shows children and fish swimming underwater around the wooden pylons of a pier, the other shows bodysurfers who are diving beneath the crash of a breaking wave.

Books

Diary titled A Voyage to Australia in the Barque William Watson, 1849
Privately printed by R B Scammell, this is a diary of the voyage undertaken by Luther Scammell who was surgeon on the William Watson. It voyaged from Gravesend in England to Port Adelaide, South Australia, from 19 May to 17 September 1849. Scammell went on to become a partner in the medical firm of F H Faulding & Co, and was influential in the development of the South Australian olive oil industry. Purchased from New Century Antiquarian Books.

Rare books, The Voyage of the Discovery by Captain Robert Falcon Scott, 1905
This two volume set contains 260 full page and smaller illustrations and 19 coloured plates detailing Scott’s first expedition to Antarctica in 1901–1902. Scott’s fateful second expedition is probably the best known Antarctic adventure story of all time – despite the fact that it was actually a failure. His first expedition is often relegated to the sidelines. Purchased from Fisher Nautical.

The Body Beautiful by Annette Kellerman, New York 1909
Annette Kellerman was a world-famous swimmer, diver and dancer who moved from Australia to Europe and America in the early 1900s. She won an American competition to find the world’s most perfect female form (the first beauty contest) conducted by Harvard University in 1905. This and her enthusiasm for educating the public made her an authority on all aspects of female physical beauty and health. As well as publishing this book Kellerman held physical culture classes and gave lectures and demonstrations on the subject across the USA until the 1920s. She campaigned for the right of women to be athletic, and opposed the encumbrance of voluminous early swimming costumes.

Tools & equipment

Collection of whaling material purchased at Sotheby’s Fine Americana auction
Lot 676 Brand bomb gun; lot 677 Eben Pierce darting gun; lot 723 group of four whale oil lamps; lot 727 J M Wyatt’s blackening box; lot 728 two advertising tiles, bank note and photograph; lot 729 four whale oil bottles; lot 730, four advertising cards for Soapine. USA Bicentennial Gift Fund

White Free Flight mini malibu surfboard damaged by shark attack
The mini malibu surfboard was made by Phil Myers of Ballina in the 1990s. It is made of polyurethane foam core with fibreglass/resin finish, single stringer and three black fins. It was purchased second-hand in 2001 by Roger Frankland, who used it until the shark attack on 23 November 2001, off Flat Rock Beach near Ballina, New South Wales. The board shows dents, and radial creasing and bite marks from an 8–10-ft black whaler shark. The attack received prominent media attention. The surfboard is graphic evidence of the natural hazards of surfing.

Clothing & accessories

White satin sash worn by Fremantle Fishing Boat Festival Queen 2000
The sash, with gold fringing and lettering ‘Fishing Boat Festival Queen 2000’ was worn by Jessica Allegretta after she was crowned at the annual debutante’s ball, part of the festival celebrations in October 2000. Displayed in the new permanent exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport & play.

Woman rower’s ‘zoot’ suit, and photographic prints of Adelaide Rowing Club members in 1889 and 2000
One-piece Adelaide Rowing Club woman’s sleeveless ‘zoot’ suit, consisting of white bottom and red, black and yellow striped top with club monogram on the breast. These club colours were first adopted in 1889 on a ‘short-sleeved jersey of hoops of black, red and yellow, white knickerbockers, black cap with monogram’. The 1889 photograph shows club members, office bearers and coxswains in both rowing uniform and day dress outside the original clubhouse which was destroyed by flood later that year. The modern print shows club members outside their clubhouse to celebrate the opening of the 2000 rowing season.

Medals, coins & stamps

Australia–Sweden joint stamp issue, 2001
To commemorate the life and work of Daniel Solander (1733–1782) who travelled as naturalist with James Cook and Joseph Banks on HMB Endeavour, first day covers, stamp packs, posters and maximum cards were produced jointly by Swedish Post and Australia Post.

Models & model parts

Model of a dragon boat, and a painting Asking the Heavens – portrait of Qu Yuan by Rocky S S Wong
Dragon boat racing is a feature of one of the three most important festivals celebrated throughout China. It originated as a fisherman’s festival in Foshan province in the delta country of China, but now takes place in over 20 countries. In 1984 the Australian Chinese community introduced dragon boat racing to Perth and Sydney. Today all states compete for the honour of representing the country in Hong Kong’s dragon boat festival. The model is based on the lines of the fibreglass boats paddled in Australia. The painting commemorates the beloved poet and statesman Qu Yuan who, accused of treason by corrupt officials of the Kindom of Chu, threw himself into the Mi Lo river. Fisherman raced to save him but could only recover his body, re-enacted now on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month during the dragon boat festival.

Model of a Fremantle fishing boat, 2001
This model of a timber, auxiliary sail fishing boat of the kind built in Fremantle during the 1950s was built by model makers Coleman Design for the museum for display in a story about the Fremantle Fishing Fleet Festival for the new permanent exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport & play.

Ceramics

China Trade pewter globe, lidded with a stepped circular base, 18th–19th century

The continents and oceans are identified with Chinese characters. Dated to the first half of the 19th century, but possibly second half of 18th century. USA Bicentennial Gift Fund purchase.

Painted terracotta statue of Our Lady of Martyrs, 2001
The statue was made in Molfetta, Italy. This is an example of the small ceramic replicas made by the church and brought to Fremantle for its annual fishing fleet blessing and festival, one of the stories unveiled in the new permanent exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport & play.

Ceramic platters by Gerry Wedd, 2001
Ceramic platters, Thongs and Sandman, representing icons of modern surfing culture. Sandman shows the ubiquitous surfie panel van and roof-racked surf boards in a contemporary take on Chinese willow pattern. They were shown as part of Tubular Cells exhibition in 2001 at Silicon Pulp Animation Gallery, Sydney. Both were acquired for the exhibition Watermarks – adventure, sport & play.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 3 Donors to the collection

Warwick Abadee
Tie
World War II HMAS Hobart Association neck tie, Hollco Int’l (Austalia) Pty. Ltd.

Anonymous Donor
Technical drawings and specifications for official badges of the Royal Australian Navy
Linen with gouache painted badges and black text with specifications. Drawn at Navy Office Canberra, includes HMAS Orion boat badge and ship badge, HMAS Onslow approved badge specification drawing and official badge RAN specifications and drawing. Drawn by T Lech,
25 September 1968.

Admiral A L Beaumont AC, RAN
Ceremonial patrol black uniform of Admiral Alan Lee Beaumont AC, RAN, Chief of the Defence Force of Australia
Winter uniform jacket and trousers. Jacket shows principle Warfare Officer’s badge (PWO badge) and ceremonial ribbons – Order of Australia, Long Service, Vietnam Service.

Blackmores Ltd
Kay Cottee sailing equipment and memorabilia
Collection of over 800 items comprising a large percentage of the contents taken on board the yacht Blackmores First Lady by Australian yachtswoman Kay Cottee during her successful ocean voyage to become the first woman to sail solo, nonstop and unassisted around the world in 1987–88. The items were gathered by Kay Cottee and her project team in 1987 to fit out her yacht. The items were stowed on board the yacht during its 189-day journey, and returned in situ to Sydney Harbour 5 June 1988.

Lydia Bushell
The Bushell Collection
Three items from the family of Ralph R G Bushell (1925–2001) comprising an embroidered canvas wall hanging with three pockets; a hand-coloured photograph of the ship Rona, from the studio of Alfred W Dufty, Marine and Landscape Photographer, Erskine Street, Sydney, framed in a miniature lifebuoy about 1912; and a copy of a printed booklet of testimonials to Captain Fairchild, 1896.

Don Caporn
One pair of rubber sea boots, made by the North British Rubber Company Ltd, Edinburgh.
Boots worn by Don Caporn while serving as a merchant ship’s officer in the 1950s.

Ivan James Cochrane
Program of visit to Melbourne by German cruiser Koeln in 1933 and leave/ration book, 1919
German text on front cover reads ‘Programm fur den besuch des kreuzers Koeln in Melbourne vom 10–19 April 1933’; leave or duty ration book, soldier or sailor, 1919.

HON QC MP Peter Collins
Royal Australian Naval material
Bofor shells with HMAS Creswell badge; photographic print HMAS Sydney mounted on card; drypoint etching HMAS Sydney and Emden by Frank H Mason; watercolour Coming Home by Fred Elliott; HMAS Sydney and Royal visit ephemera.

Christopher Barry Cotter
Australian Power Boat Association certificate and related documents
Certificate: Australian Power Boat Association Australian Record Class 135 cu in Event Unrestricted, awarded to Keith Barry in Firefly II who broke the Australian record with a run of 78.006 miles per hour in a course at Kogarah Bay on 11 November 1950. Certificate signed, dated by referee and secretary 12 April 1951; page from a photograph album containing telegrams and newspaper clippings relating to Barry Cotter’s world record.

Brian Creegan
Ocean Earth rope and rubber leg rope/surf leash with velcro ankle strap about 1977
An early example of leg rope technology which was first introduced to Australia from the US in 1975.

Donor Unknown
Menu
Menu from HMAS Lithgow Christmas day 1941.

Daina Fletcher
Moree Champion newspaper, Tuesday May 30, 2000 edition
Front page shows article and images of the crowd gathered to mark the 35 years since the Freedom Ride for Aboriginal Rights visited the NSW town of Moree and facilitated the first ever unmediated visit by Aboriginal children to the Moree Spa Baths in 1965.

John Henry Gill
Royal Australian Navy service records and medals
Royal Australian Navy service records of John Henry Robert Gill; strip of medals: Long Service and Good Conduct medal, the Australia Service medal, 1939–1945, the Defence medal, the 1939–1945 Star; strip of medals: the Pacific Star medal and the Australia Service 1939–1945 medal.

Goldfinch
Fuso mf-100 marine depth finder in timber box complete with chart rolls
200 Khz transducer with a 14-degree beam angle. Specifically designed for small to medium sized fishing vessels, runabouts, pleasure and sailing vessels. Has flashing neon indicator and chart recorder display. Variable paper speed. Used by Mr Goldfinch, an amateur fisherman.

J F Goldie
Papers and medals relating to Frederick William Woodland
Frederick William Woodland was lost during WWI when the Australian submarine AE1 sank without trace on 14 September 1914 in New Guinea waters. Collection includes the commemorative booklet sent to all relatives of those serving on AE1 titled, Loss of submarine AE1; Woodland’s service medals; official letter to Woodland’s wife, Mrs Helen Emma Woodland, from the Admiralty on behalf of the King and Winston Churchill; memorial plaque and accompanying letter to Mrs Woodland from Buckingham Palace; commemorative scroll recording his loss; and various letters to Mrs Woodland regarding her pension and those of her two children.

Joan Gray
Swimwear and accessories
One-piece Triumph International women’s size 32 swimming costume with tropical island motif; pair of yellow and black sun glasses about 1960s; blue and white polka dot mirror based make-up bag with drawstring tie about 1960s.

Grundy Organisation
Ian Hansen painting, oil on canvas, 1988
Painting titled Investigator and Geographe at Encounter Bay depicts the historic encounter in South Australian waters between the English and French expeditions led respectively by Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin in April 1802. All representations of this momentous event have been modern recreations as none of the artists of the expeditions appear to have recorded the event. Ian Hansen is one of Australia’s foremost maritime artists.

Zelia Ellen Hawkins
Rowing memorabilia
Selection of 1920s rowing memorabilia belonging to champion lady rower Elsie Ellen Hawkins.

Matt Hayes
One Olympic sailing bib
Bib was worn by Matt Hayes when he competed in the Soling class at the 1996 Olympics.

J Hoppitt
General arrangement of HMS Duchess, 1952
HMS Duchess was built as one of the Daring class destroyers for the Royal Navy. After the tragic collision between HMAS Voyager and HMAS Melbourne in 1964 when Voyager was sunk, the Royal Australian Navy first borrowed and then purchased Duchess as a replacement. These specifications show the general arrangement of the ship. Text in top left corner reads ‘1051/4087/52 H.M.S Duchess general arrangement profile. As fitted. Scale 1:48’.

Brendan Jackson
Complete set of 25 posters issued by the Royal Australian Navy as part of their 75th anniversary celebrations, 1986
Set comprises images of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second and His Royal Highness the Prince Philip, Duke Of Edinburgh; the first RAN fleet at Farm Cove, 1913, from a painting by John Bastock; HMAS Sydney, from a painting by John Bastock; HMAS Tingira; HMAS Albatross and Seagull III amphibian; HMAS Adelaide from a painting by John Bastock; HMAS Wilcannia, Kanimbla and Goorangai; HMAS Parramatta at Port Said, 1941, from a painting by Frank Norton; HMAS Deloraine; HMAS Sydney in battle 1940 from a painting by Frank Norton; HMAS Australia, 1939; HMAS Napier, 1940s, from a painting by Roy Hodgkinson; HMAS Bataan, 1952; HMAS Sydney, 1951, from a painting by Ray Honisett; HMAS Tobruk, Vampire, Quiberon and Parramatta; HMAS Melbourne, flagship 1956–1982; HMAS Onslow; HMAS Adelaide, Stalwart, Torrens, Supply, Vampire, Canberra and Swan; HMAS Brisbane, Hobart and Perth, 1985; HMAS Moresby and Cook, 1983; HMAS Tobruk, Grumman Trackers; HMAS Adelaide; HMAS Fremantle; HMAS Success, 1986.

Margaret Kiley-Balas
Collection of naval memorabilia and personal items
Collection comprises photographs of HMAS Tingira, Sydney and Australia; menu; framed cap tallys; manuals and booklets; leatherwork piece, Melbourne Centenary; braided cord; photographs taken by J Kiley during naval service; ditty box and contents.

W Kirsop
Two-person Canadian river canoe and accessories built and designed by George King about 1952
Canoe constructed of Pacific maple planking, ribs of spotted gum, rubbing strakes of brush box wood with sealed canvas skin; two canvas spray covers about 1952 made by Margaret Kirsop; four wooden single blade paddles and one wooden double ended paddle; one lid to storage drum about 1950s. The canoe was used by Tom and Margaret Kirsop on river canoe trips from 1952 until the early 1960s.

Peter Kurts
Yachting equipment
Yachtsman’s safety harness and line made by Burke Marine Model YSH-B3, 29 July 1986; orange/ yellow personal flotation device (PFD) in the ‘Mae West’ style about 1990s, hand written on front LOVE & WAR; harness and PFD used by Peter Kurts on board his yacht Love and War which competed in Sydney–Hobart Yacht races in 1973, 1975, 1976 and 1996.

Richard Lewis
Paper-based material relating to the champion sculling/rowing careers of North Sydney sisters Gertie and Kitty Lewis 1905–1912
Three issues of Fairplay, 1912; letters and handwritten notes; race program, Ladies Sculling Championship of Australia 1911; program card, North Sydney Amateur Skiff Rowing Club 1906; program, Balmain Regatta 1906; photograph of either Kitty or Gertie Lewis about 1906–1911; newspaper cuttings 1905–1911; drawing of Kitty Lewis (taken from a 1906 newspaper cutting) commissioned by Kitty Lewis’ grandson Richard Lewis in 1999, artist unknown.

Eric Lobbecke
Original cartoon by News Limited cartoonist Eric Lobbecke
Cartoon, ‘... some foursome’, published 1 December 1998 in The Australian newspaper.

Bob Lynch
Diving equipment and photographs
Diving equipment and photographs dating from 1940–1960, including demand valve made by Wally Gibbons, 1950, aqualung, spear gun, depth gauge and compass used by Bob Lynch.

Manly Warringah and Pittwater Historical Society
Lantern slides
Set of seven lantern slides depicting the following vessels: HMAS Sydney, HMAS Yarra, HMAS Parramatta, HMAS Warrego, HMAS Australia.

Elsa McGill
Collection of equipment made and used by Ted McGill 1950s–1960s for the manufacture of wooden Marlin waterskis
Collection comprises bending jig for shaping wooden skis; price list mounted on wood; postage list mounted on wood; list of ski dimensions on wood; wooden mould for sand casting fins; wooden mould for sandcasting fittings; box containing spare fittings and rubber foot straps; ski templates; single Marlin ski used by Mrs Elsa McGill; ski blanks; box of tins used for holding screws; tin advertising signs for Marlin waterskis. This collection presents the process of waterski manufacture prior to the introduction of fibreglass skis in the late 1960s and reflects the technology used by a small Australian manufacturer.

Geraldine McMannis
Men’s Golden Ray red and black woollen racer back surf suit, made by David Jones, about 1931
Suit has Jetty Surf Club on torso and was worn by Gerald McCartney.

C W E Moore
Items relating to Captain William Keeling
Pastel on paper portrait of Captain William Keeling by R Coslett, 1834, and replica of Captain Keeling’s memorial board by Ros Pritchard, 1993.

Moree Plains Shire Council
Reconciliation memorabilia
Two reconciliation badges and twelve coloured cardboard/paper hands decorated with pen/pencil/texta and attached to paddle-pop sticks/chopsticks. Made by Moree schoolchildren for the ‘Pool of Hands’ reconciliation event held May 30 2000 to mark 35 years since the Freedom Ride for Aboriginal Rights passed through the town and facilitated the first unmediated entry to the Moree Spa Baths by Aboriginal people. The ‘hands’ were planted in the forecourt of the baths by local schoolchildren.

Barry Moscrop
Painting, HMS Inflexible
Watercolour painting of HMS Inflexible, possibly at Fort Macquarie, 1847. Attributed to Frederick Garling.

Nielsen Kellerman Australia Pty Ltd
Collection of 1990s rowing technology
Interval ‘TM’ 1000 Split Rate watch; PaceCoach rowing computer; cox box including microphone, speaker and read-out; SpeedCoach; StrokeCoach.

Greg Paine
Bicentennial commemorative ceramic plate, HMB Endeavour, 1970
Plaque features the crests of the states of Australia, the Australian crest and portrait of James Cook and an image of HMB Endeavour. The plate was manufactured ‘to commemorate the bi-centenary of the discovery of Australia 1770–1970’.

Francis Pinel
Sterling silver claret jug, S Smith and W Nicholson, 1862–63
Jug decorated with a filigreed grapevine and bearing a presentation inscription pertaining to the Sydney Harbour Anniversary Regatta 1863: ‘Presented to / JOHN PINEL / By the Committee of the Sydney New / South Wales Anniversary Regatta 1863. / In acknowledgement of the courteous / manner in which on that occasion he / placed his ship the Tiptree at the / Committee’s disposal, and his valuable / aid in contributing generally to the / success of the Regatta / Sydney 26th March 1863’.

RANTEAA
ACR Fire Rescue Lite Model ACR/4G designed for underwater applications
This personal rescue strobe light is made for underwater applications and used by Navy UDT and SEAL teams and commercial salvage divers. Made by ACR Electronics Inc, Florida, USA. Personal rescue beacons were recommended for yacht crews to increase their visibility in the water after the experiences of the massive search and rescue operations during the 1998 Sydney–Hobart Yacht Race.

Rhonda Reynolds
Textile
Silk square with blue stripe in centre and hand stitching, (possibly made by a Royal Australian Navy sailor). Date of manufacture unknown.

Rip Curl
Oral history recording with Brian Singer, co-founder of Rip Curl
Oral history recording of interview with Brian Singer, co-founder of Rip Curl.

Max Robertson
Australia–Sweden joint issue first day covers, stamp packs, poster and maximum cards commemorating Daniel Solander, (1733–1782)
Swedish-born Solander travelled as naturalist with James Cook and Joseph Banks on HMB Endeavour. First day covers, stamps, poster and maximum cards issued jointly by Australia Post and Sweden Post, 16 August 2001.

Tim Robin
Ship’s bell from the bridge of Australian Enterprise, an Australian National

Line (ANL) vehicle deck container carrier.
Built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe, Japan, the ship was commissioned in 1969. The bell is made of brass and has engraved on one side AUSTRALIAN ENTERPRISE / 1969.

Marcelle Rose
Tanner and Rose clown memorabilia
Marcelle Rose (aka Bubbles) and Harold Tanner (aka Poncho) performed as clowns on the ships Fairsky, Fairstar, Oriana, Canberra, Minghua and Achille Lauro from 1976 to 1995. Collection contains: prop box, clown suits, hat, jewellery, shoes, wig, glasses, make-up, props and signs.

Royal Australian Mint
Commemorative coins
Two five dollar commemorative coins USS Houston and HMAS Perth, Battle of Sunda Strait, 1942–2002, USS Houston. Manufactured by Royal Australian Mint 2002. Designed by Vladimir Gottwald.

Royal Australian Navy HMAS Waterhen
Commemorative coin
One dollar commemorative coin – 90th anniversary of the Royal Australian Navy 1911–2001, aluminium bronze, 9.00 grams, 25 mm. Manufactured by Royal Australian Mint 2001. Designed by Vladimir Gottwald.

Lindsey Shaw
Royal Australian Navy counterpanes
Two blue and white counterpanes with official Royal Australian Navy badge featured in centre with pattern surrounding and white border on edge.

Royal Australian Navy uniform
Black double breasted winter coat, RAN short black; RAN black dinner vest; RAN black lieutenants dinner jacket; RAN black sub-lieutenants coat; RAN black trousers; RAN double breasted black coat; black trousers plus cummerbund.

Peter Sheard
Souvenir of HMAS Sydney
Unidentified silver-plated object of oval shape featuring an anchor hinged to the bottom. It is engraved as follows: Nov 9 1914 Emden sunk by HMAS Sydney.

Howard Smith
A quantity of memorabilia from Howard Smith shipping company
Material includes a bridge telescope from SS Edina; a ship’s bell engraved ‘Howard Smith Melbourne’ in a stand; a framed oil painting of SS Bombala; a framed coloured print by A C Cooke with vignettes of Howard Smith subjects; a framed photograph of Captain William Howard Smith; framed photograph of William Howard Smith; two photographs of Howard Smith cricket teams; a framed blueprint drawing of TSS Mourilyan; a framed sea-going certificate for SS Time; company ephemera and memorabilia.

Speedo Australia
Speedo swimwear and promotional material
Swimming women’s size 27 Olympic 2000 ‘Fastskin’ bodysuit; large Qantas promotional poster featuring colour photograph of Susie O’Neill in Speedo swimming costume and cap; two large promotional posters of Ian Thorpe.

Dawn Springett
Decorated carved wooden turtle
Carved wooden turtle decorated with fish and bird motifs.

St Patricks Church
Silver statue of the Catholic saint Madonna di Capo d’Orlando
Statue belonged to Father Donald Hughes, parish priest of St Patricks Church in Fremantle, which is used annually by the local Italian community to celebrate the Blessing of the Fishing Fleet.

Fred Steedman
Photograph of HMAS Australia
Photograph in a teak frame. Plaque on centre of frame. Inscription reads ‘HMAS Australia. First flagship of the Royal Australian Navy 1913–1920. Sunk under terms of the Washington Treaty 12th April 1924. This frame is made of teak from the deck of the vessel’.

R Tidswell
Photograph showing HMAS Parramatta I at Fremantle, Western Australia 1910
Photograph shows the arrival of HMAS Parramatta at Fremantle, WA, 21 November 1910.

Carl Toovey
Two-piece double-ended wooden paddle used by Oskar Speck, marathon canoe race certificate and oral history recording
Paddle has engraved plaque ‘Cruising Canoe Club / Paddle used by Oskar Speck / Germany to Australia 1939 / 30,000 miles / presented by J L Manson / For best single kayak performance / Awarded To / 1951 C Toovey 1952 / C TOOVEY 1953’. Autographed certificate with handwritten text, ‘The / Commonwealth / Jubilee Celebrations / Cruising Club / The First 100 Mile ‘Marathon’ / Canoe-Race’; oral history recording with Carl Toovey recorded 21 January 2002.

Bruce Treble
Silk souvenir program
Blue and cream silk souvenir program printed for the 72nd Hobart Regatta held on the Derwent River 25 January 1910.

Nicola Visaggio
Fremantle Fishing Fleet Festival memorabilia
Twenty-four Fremantle Fishing Fleet Festival programs, 1969–2001; booklet, La Madonna dei Martiri in Australia 1996; eight patron saint prayer cards for Madonna dei Martiri and Maria Santissimo di Capo d’Orlando. All objects are associated with the Blessing of the Fleet and the Fishing Fleet Festival held in Fremantle each year by the Italian Australian fishing community.

Margaret Williams
Manuscript diary, 1872
Diary written on board the wooden sailing ship Commissary by Henry John Corbett, a 16-year old male passenger, on a voyage from Sydney to London, between May 11 and August 12, 1872. The diary contains references to life at sea, entertainment and amusements, maritime events, diet and health. Corbett was also very interested in the working of the craft and the diary contains comments illustrated with a few sketches on different types of sailing rig. The Commissary was a wooden, three-masted, 899-ton ship, built at Halls Shipyard in Aberdeen in 1868.

Mike Yates
Seamen’s papers from detained Indonesian fishing vessels
Papers include captain’s licence with photo; boat certificates from the Dunia Wanita, Sumbar Mas, Bunga Arfa, Sumarni; log book from the Dunia Wanita. These boats were apprehended west of Thursday Island in March 1999 and later forfeited in the courts. These papers are quite rare as they are usually thrown overboard when apprehended by Fisheries or Customs.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 4 ANMM publications
 
 

Books

Captain Cook’s Endeavour: Resource kit for teachers by David Stewart, published for the Australian National Maritime Museum and the HM Bark Endeavour Foundation 2001. ISBN 0 642 565856 77pp including illustrations

Food at Sea – eating and drinking with sailors 1500–2000: Stories and recipes editor Bill Richards, published by the Australian National Maritime Museum 2001. ISBN 0 642708185 35pp including illustrations

Exhibition publications

Banumbirr, various contributors, published by Elcho Island Art and Craft and Bandigan Aboriginal Art and Craft 2002, for the Australian National Maritime Museum. 44pp including colour illustrations

Stitches – Fare Il Punto Australian National Maritime Museum 2001. ISBN 0 642 705291 36pp including colour illustrations

VASA 1628 – strange fate of a King’s warship by Erling Matz, published by the Australian National Maritime Museum courtesy of the Vasa Museum, Sweden 2001. ISBN 91 85168 37 28pp including colour illustrations

Serials

Signals quarterly colour magazine of the Australian National Maritime Museum Nos 56–59. ISSN 1033-4688. 36pp. Editor Jeffrey Mellefont. Published September, December, March, June. Free to Members

Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2000–2001. ISSN 1034-5019. 105pp. Editor Jeffrey Mellefont

Newsletter monthly newsletter of the Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers. Issues 86–97. c. 10pp. Editor Peter Wood. Published monthly, free to ANMM Volunteers

Educational resources

Portholes – free newsletter for Teacher Friends of the Australian National Maritime Museum. 4pp, published Winter, Spring and Autumn. Editor Jeffrey Fletcher

What is History? – activity sheets for junior secondary students. Includes workshop notes and tour sheets for students and teachers. Written by Jeannie Douglass

Shipwreck & Salvage – update of tour sheets and workshop notes for Year 12 Chemistry students and teachers. Additions by Richard Neville, teacher guide

Stopping the Rot – workshop notes for primary and secondary students to complement the Food at Sea festival. Written by Jeffrey Fletcher

The Mapmaker’s Brother – a 30-minute play for junior primary students to be performed in the exhibition Oceans Apart – The story of Ann and Matthew Flinders. Commissioned from playwright Alana Valentine

World Wide Web

Australian National Maritime Museum Web Site http://www.anmm.gov.au Updated continually. Webmaster Jeffrey Mellefont, publications manager

The Welcome Wall http://www.anmm.gov.au/ww Searchable database of all Welcome Wall registrations including personal histories. On-line registration for intending participants
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 5 Staff publications

Robin ARCHER, ‘Tom Keneally welcomes new Welcome Wall subscribers’, article, Signals No 57 2001–2002:40

Penny CUTHBERT, ‘50,000 km by kayak’, feature article, Signals No 58: 2002:10–14

Max DINGLE, ‘How can museum management instigate change and include civil society in the processes?’, feature article, Friends Review February 2002.

Jeannie DOUGLAS, ‘Bringing schools on board’, feature article, Signals No 58 2002:30–32

Diane FENTON, ‘Back to classics’, article, Signals No 59 2002:8–10

Kieran HOSTY, AIMA Newsletters 20:2 2001, 20:3 2001, 20:4 2001
- ‘ANMM in Newport’, on-line essay, http: www.anmm.gov.au/findhmb.htm 01/08/01
-‘Endeavour – The quest goes on’, article, Signals No 56 2001:35
- ‘Vasa 1628 – Strange fate of a King’s warship’, feature article, Signals No 57 2001:25–29
- ‘New exhibition tells vivid story of Vasa’, Antiques in New South Wales 12/2001–05/2002

Paul HUNDLEY, ‘Gold rush drama’, feature article, Signals No 56 2001:27–29
- ‘Endeavour The quest goes on’, feature article, Signals No 56 2001:27–29

- ‘What is a maritime archaeologist?’, article, Portholes Spring 2001:2

Will MATHER, ‘ARC Conference workshop No. 1 – Robyn Sloggett’, paper, Journal of the Australian Registrars Committee, Vol 39, 12/2001:9-10

Jeffrey MELLEFONT, ‘Seni perhiasan perahu dalam masyarakat kebaharian Madura [Decorative arts on boats of the Madurese maritime communities]’, feature article, Dunia Ini magazine July 2001:48–52

- ‘Australian National Maritime Museum corporate history’, on-line essay, http://www.anmm.gov.au/corphist.htm 30/11/01
- ‘Ill-starred captains – Flinders & Baudin’, book review, Signals No 55 2001:33
- ‘Stoker’s Submarine’, book review, Signals No 55 2001:33
- ‘Let there be light – Lighthouses of Australia’, book review, Signals No 57 2001:32
- A most remarkable pine – The Huon Pine Story’, book review, Signals No 57 2001:32
- ‘Ports, bars & beaches – Ships & Shores & Trading Ports’, book review, Signals No 57 2001:33
- ‘Celebrating the Little Dove – To Build a Ship: Duyfken’, book review, Signals No 57 2001:33
- ‘First, murder your mud crab!’, article, ‘Food at Sea – Eating and drinking with sailors 1500–2000: Stories and recipes’, 2001:27–30
- ‘Exploring many maritime cultures’, feature article, Signals No 58 2002:5–6
- ‘A rum tale, told well – Cargo for the Colony’, book review, Signals No 58 2002:33
- ‘Drink and the devil – a history of rum, the sailor’s drink’, feature article, Signals No 59 2002:23–26
- ‘Lars & Harold Halvorsen Collection’, article, Signals No 59 2002:12–13
- ‘Museum apprentice program helps shipwrighting skills alive’, article, Signals No 59 2002:36

Patricia MILES, ‘Waterfront labour history unveiled at Wharf 7’, Signals No. 59 2002:35

Bill RICHARDS, ‘Food for thought: The Food at Sea Festival’, feature article, Signals No 56 2001: 8–10
- ‘Sub grub!’, feature article, Signals No 56 2001:12–13
- ‘Food festivity & fun’, feature article, Signals No 57 2001:23-26
- ‘The Australian National Maritime Museum presents the Food at Sea Festival’, Antiques in New South Wales 09–12/2001, 35, 43
- ‘Meet the foyer fleet’, feature article, Signals No 58 2002:26–28
- ‘Australian National Maritime Foundation’, feature article, Signals No 59 2002:29
- ‘Food for thought’, article, Educare News 01/11/2002:47
-Researcher / editor, ‘Food at Sea – Eating and drinking with sailors 1500–2000: Stories and recipes’, handbook of the Food at Sea Festival, Australian National Maritime Museum 2001.
Bill RICHARDS, ‘Packed tight in HMAS Onslow – Submarine cuisine!’, article, ‘Food at Sea – Eating and drinking with sailors 1500–2000 : Stories and recipes’, 2001:27–30

Susan SEDGWICK, ‘Celebrating 10 years telling a maritime story’, article, Signals No 57 2001–2002:6–7

-‘Smugglers on the road’, article, Signals No 55 2001:12–13

Lindsey SHAW, ‘Australian fishes – Illustrations by Walter Stackpool, article, Signals No 56 2001:7

- AIMA Newsletters 21:1 2002, 21:2 2001
- AAMH Newsletters No 86, No 87
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, feature article, Signals No 59 2002:4–7

Megan TREHARNE, ‘Making marks on water’, feature article, Signals 56 2001: 24–26

Chris WAUGH, ‘Play exhibition’, Signals 57, 2001–2002:11–13

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, ‘Navigations of heart and head’, review of Matthew Flinders Personal Letters from an Extraordinary Life by Paul Brunton, Spectrum, Sydney Morning Herald 1–2/06/2002

Peter WOOD, Newsletter, monthly newsletter of the Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers. c. 10pp. Editor Peter Wood. Published monthly, free to ANMM Volunteers. Issues this financial year 86 to 97
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 6 Staff conference papers & lectures

Susan BRIDIE, lecture to Pymble Ladies College, year 11 Business Studies Course
19/08/2001

Penny CUTHBERT, ‘Oskar Speck – A paddler’s adventure’, lecture to ANMM Members 30/06/2002

Max DINGLE, ‘The responsibility of society in running museums’, paper, International Council of Museums 19th General Conference ‘Managing Change’ 1 July 2001 Barcelona, Spain.
- Museums Australia 2002 ‘What’s happening now?’ Chairing panel of five speakers Friends SIG seminar, Museums Australia National Conference – 19/03/2002 Adelaide.

Mariea FISHER, ‘Legally a contract’, International Council of Museums 19th General Conference, International Committee Exhibition Exchange 03/07/2001
- ‘Management methods – which one in the 21st century’, International Council of Musuems 19th General Conference, International Committee Exhibition Exchange 04/07/2001
- ‘Contextual learning – its influence on exhibition development’, presenter, 3rd Science Centre World Congress 11/02/2002
- Plenary session ‘Exhibition critique: Australian Aboriginal cultures gallery, South Australian Museum’, Museums Australia Conference 2002
- Temporary & Travelling Exhibitions Special Interest Group, workshop chair, Museums Australia Conference 2002

Jeffrey FLETCHER, ‘Hands-on school programs’, paper, Australian Maritime Museums Council Annual Conference session Mammoth Programs for Mini-Museums 2–4/11/2001

Kieran HOSTY, ‘Maritime archaeology in Australia’, lecture to the RAN Hydrographic Office 19/09/2001
- ‘Vasa’, lecture to ANMM volunteer guides,
13/12/2001
- ‘Vasa’, lecture to ANMM teacher guides
16/11/2001
- ‘Vasa’, WEA course 21/11/2001
- ANMM Archaeology workshops for St Patricks College, Sutherland, 28/02/2002; Santa Sabini Girls College 05/03/2002; Knox Grammar 27/05/2002; Riverina High School 03/06/2002
- ‘Maritime archaeology and ceramics’, lecture to Macquarie University students 10/04/2002
- ‘Maritime archaeology’, lecture to senior high school students, ANMM Maritime Careers Day, 17/06/2002

Paul HUNDLEY, ‘Gold Rush! The Australian Experience’, lecture to ANMM Members, 08/08/01
- ‘American whalers in Australia’, lecture to Institute for Study Abroad, ANMM 02/02/2002
- ‘The ANMM scrimshaw collection’, lecture to Kendall Whaling Museum 03/03/2002
- Maritime Archaeology Workshop, ANMM Visitor Programs 04/04/2002

Jeffrey MELLEFONT, ‘Maritime ethnology – fieldwork among Madurese littoral communities’, lecture to postgraduate anthropology students, University of New South Wales 09/08/2001
- ‘Rum, sodomy and the lash – A sailor’s history of rum’, lecture and rum tasting, Classic & Wooden Boat Festival, ANMM 02/03/2002

Patricia MILES, ‘Lucinda – Little ship of state’, lecture at ANMM 5/08/2001
- Talk on Cape Bowling Green Lighthouse, Volunteers morning tea, ANMM 26/03/2002

Bill RICHARDS, ‘Food as a yardstick of the quality of life at sea’, conference paper, Second International Conference, Research Centre for the History of Food and Drink, University of Adelaide 03/07/2001
- ‘Food at Sea – the making of a festival,’ lecture, Universities and Schools Club 11/11/2001

Susan SEDGWICK, Smugglers – Customs & Contraband travelling exhibition’, lecture to Old Parliament House staff, guides and front of house 08/02/2002

Lindsey SHAW, ‘Australian fishes – Illustrations by Walter Stackpool’, lecture to Australian Museum volunteers 24/08/2001
- ‘HMAS Sydney (I)’, lecture to ANMM Members 16/02/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, lecture to ANMM Members
27/03/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, lecture to ANMM Volunteers
28/03/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, lecture to front of house and security staff 28/03/2002, 08/04/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, lecture, Heritage Week 24/04/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, lecture to State Library of New South Wales Members 05/04/2002
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, WEA Course, 08/05/2002
- ‘The love letters of Matthew Flinders’, lecture to ANMM Members 18/05/2002

Martin TERRY, ‘Travelling north’, lecture at Rockhampton Art Gallery, 13/10/2001
- ‘Painting the Pacific’, lecture at State Library of New South Wales, 2/04/2002

Susan WEIR, ‘The hierarchy of visitor perception’, lecture to AGDA members and the general public 06/05/2002
- ‘The anatomy of a museum design department’, lecture to Wollongong University students 15/05/2002

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, ‘Collecting and keeping historical material’, Department of Veterans Affairs Conference, Sydney 26/11/2001
- ‘Museums & art galleries create, perpetuate & sell myths’, debate moderator – Museums Australia Conference, Adelaide 20/03/2002
- ‘Museums and public benefit’, Graduation Address – University of Technology, Sydney 03/04/2002
 
 

APPENDIX 7 Staff media appearances

This Appendix lists appearances by museum staff communicating their research and special expertise to a wider audience. Not listed here are the many electronic and print media appearances made by staff of the museum’s publicity unit as part of their day-to-day work.

Penny CUTHBERT ‘The remarkable Oskar Speck’, interview by Vivian Schenker, ABC Radio National 06/12/2001
- ‘Oskar Speck’ interview by Glen Taylor, Radio 4BC 12/12/2001
- ‘Oskar Speck’ interview by George Stevenson, Radio 22DJ 10/01/2002
- ‘Oskar Speck’ interview by Rebecca Baille, 7.30 Report, ABC TV 10/01/2002
- ‘Paddling on Speck’ interview by Skye Yates, The Daily Telegraph 30/01/2002
- ‘Oskar Speck’ interview by Peter Rattenby, Australian Sea Kayak Association 01/02/2002
- ‘Incredible journey of "Nazi" who canoed to Australia’, interview by Nick Squires The Telegraph, London 03/02/2002
- ‘Oskar Speck’ interview by Andy Stummer, German National Radio Network 06/02/2002
- ‘Watermarks – Adventure sport and play – Surfers theme’ interview by Mike Whitney Sydney Weekender, 7 Television Network
06/02/2002
- ‘Oskar Speck – A paddler’s adventure’, interview by Garry O’Callaghan, Radio 2UE
29/06/2002
- ‘Watermarks – Adventure sport and play’, interview, ABC Radio 2BL 702 06/12/2001

Mariea FISHER, ‘Maritime mysteries’, Simon Marnie program, ABC Radio 2BL 11/08/2001
- ‘VASA 1628 – Strange fate of a King’s warship’, Gary Callaghan program, Radio 2UE 11/12/2001

Kieran HOSTY, ‘Horatio’s howlers’, interview, Sydney Morning Herald 03/07/2001
- ‘Vasa’, interview, Sydney Morning Herald
31/10/2001
- ‘ICOMOS Underwater Cultural Heritage Convention’, interview, Sydney Morning Herald 01/11/2001
- ‘Vasa’, interview, Sydney Morning Herald
06/11/2001
- ‘Vasa’, interview, Endeavour TV 07/11/2001
- ‘Life at sea in the 18th and 19th centuries’, interview, ABC Radio National 08/11/2001
- ‘Vasa’, interview, Daily Telegraph 29/11/2001
- ‘Vasa’, interview, ABC Radio Canberra
11/01/2002
- ‘Wreck of the Collaroy’, interview, ABC Radio 2BL 23/01/2002
- ‘Vasa’, interview, ABC Radio Melbourne
22/02/2002
- ‘HMB Endeavour’, interview, The Courier Mail 11/02/2002

Paul HUNDLEY, ‘The ANMM search for Endeavour’, interview, ABC Radio Brisbane 07/07/2001
- ‘The ANMM search for Endeavour’, The Courier Mail 10/07/2001
- ‘Gold Rush! The Australian Experience’, Qantas ‘A Current of Air’ in-flight entertainment 03/2002

Jeffrey MELLEFONT, ‘Analysis of newly-released video of "children overboard" refugee vessel’, SBS TV news and current affairs 25/10/2001
- ‘Analysis of newly-released video of "children overboard" refugee vessel’, interview, Howard Sattler talkback, Radio 2SM 26/10/2001
- ‘Analysis of newly-released video of "children overboard" refugee vessel’, interview, The Daily Telegraph 26/10/2001
- ‘Lloyds List no longer referring to ships as "she"’, interview, ABC Radio 2BL 21/03/2002

Patricia MILES, ‘Pyrmont Bridge Centenary exhibition’, interview by Graham Locksley, Radio 2NBC 24/06/2002

Bill RICHARDS, Mariner takes biscuit for being a dedicated follower of food’, subject of news story, Sydney Morning Herald 03/07/2001
- ‘Ship’s biscuits’, interview, Radio 2BL
03/07/2001
- ‘Ship’s biscuits’, interview, Radio 5DM (Adelaide) 03/07/2001
- ‘Food at Sea festival’, interview, Radio 2DAY FM 01/10/2002
- ‘Submarine cuisine (Food at Sea)’, interview, Radio 2UE 03/10/2002
- ‘Food at Sea festival’, interview, Radio 2BL
04/10/2002
- ‘Cooking demonstrations (Food at Sea)’, interview, Radio 2BL 07/10/2002
- ‘Hello sailor, it’s time to dine’, interview, The Hobart Mercury 10/10/2002
- ‘Food at Sea festival’, interview, Radio 2NC (Newcastle) 11/10/2002
- ‘Food at Sea festival’, interview, Radio 2GB
12/10/2002
- ‘Food at Sea festival’, interview, Radio 2UE
13/10/2002
- ‘Pass the sauce’, interview, City Weekly Courier 15/10/2002

Susan SEDGWICK, Smugglers – Customs & Contraband travelling exhibition’, interview, Mark Vail, ABC Radio Bega 21/11/2001
- ‘Smugglers – Customs & Contraband travelling exhibition’, interview, ABC Radio Canberra 8/02/2002
- ‘Smugglers – Customs & Contraband travelling exhibition’, The Chronicle Canberra
12/02/2002

Lindsey SHAW, ‘Australian fishes – Illustrations by Walter Stackpool’, interview, Radio 2SM Reel Facts 12/08/2001
- ‘Batavia’, interview, Radio ABCR (North West) 07/12/2001
- ‘Batavia’, interview, Radio 2SM 07/12/2001
- ‘Oceans Apart – The story of Ann & Matthew Flinders’, interview, Radio 2NBC 12/04/2002

Martin TERRY, ‘Refurbishment of the James Cook Museum in Cooktown’, interview, Radio 4QY Cairns, 05/10/2001
- ‘Flinders’ re-enactments’, interview, ABC Radio Central Coast 06/03/2002

Chris WAUGH, ‘Batavia East Indies Dutch market place’, interview, Radio SBS Dutch program 08/11/2001
-Play exhibition’, 2GB 29/12/2001

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, ‘The Welcome Wall’, Radio 2SM, Sydney 04/11/2001
- ‘The history of the warship Vasa’, Swedish Radio, Sydney 14/12/2001
- guest, ABC Radio 2BL Australia All Over with Ian McNamara 30/06/2002
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 9 Staff overseas travel

Mary-Louise WILLIAMS, Director: Barcelona, Spain, 1–7/07/2001. Attended International Council of Museums Conference.
- London, Paris, Berlin, 16–25/07/2001. Negotiating venues for Saltwater collection of Aboriginal bark paintings, Darling Foundation Grant.

Mariea FISHER, manager of temporary and travelling exhibitions: Barcelona, Spain, 1–6/07/2001. Presented two papers at the International Committee Exhibition Exchange sessions of the International Council of Museums 19th General Conference.

Max DINGLE, Assistant Director Commercial & Visitor Services: Barcelona, Spain 1–6/06/2001. Attend and present paper at International Council of Museums 19th General Conference and 20th General Assembly.

Kieran HOSTY, curator of ship technology and maritime archaeology: Newport, Rhode Island, USA, 3–22/08/2002. Underwater archaeology, assisting Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project in a survey and excavation to locate HMB Endeavour.

Paul HUNDLEY, senior curator USA Gallery: Newport, Rhode Island, USA, 27/07–21/08/2001. Underwater archaeology, assisting Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project in a survey and excavation to locate HMB Endeavour.
- San Francisco, USA, 1–19/03/2002. Research in USA for Julia Ann publication with Hordern House; collection acquisitions for Patriotism, Persuasion, Propaganda exhibition.
 
 

APPENDIX 10 Sponsors, patrons & supporters
 
 

Principal sponsor

ANZ

Major sponsors

Akzo Nobel
Australian Customs Service
Optus
Cunard
Raymond Weil SA
State Forests of NSW

Sponsors

ASSA ABLOY Security
Australian Maritime Safety Authority
Blackmores Ltd
BT Australasia
DAS Distribution
Energy Australia
Institution of Engineers Australia
John West Foods
Bill & Jean Lane
Louis Vuitton Australia
National Council for Centenary of Federation
P&O Nedlloyd
Speedo Australia
Spotless Services
Wallenius Wilhelmsen
Weldon International
Western Wood Products Association

Founding patrons

Alcatel Australia
ANL Limited
Ansett Air Freight
Bovis Lend Lease
BP Australia
Bruce & Joy Reid Foundation
Doyle’s Seafood Restaurants
Howard Smith Limited
James Hardie Industries
PG, TG & MG Kailis
National Australia Bank
P&O Nedlloyd
Telstra
Westpac Banking Corporation
Wallenius Wilhelmsen
Zim Shipping Australasia

Patrons

3M Australia
Crawford Partners Architects
Harbourside Darling Harbour
Maxwell Optical Industries
ING

Project sponsors

Andrew Thynne Reid Trust
ASSA ABLOY Australia Pacific
ASSA ABLOY Security
Atlas Copco Compressors Australia
Aurion Gold
Australian Gold Council
CGEA Transport Sydney
Coasts and Clean Seas
Commonwealth Bank
CSIRO
DAS Distribution
Dept of Foreign Affairs & Trade
Discovery Channel
Enviro Doctor
Environment Australia
Finnair
Forrest Training
Freedom Group Ltd
Heineken Australia
KLM
Maritime Union of Australia
Martinair Cargo
Natural Heritage Trust
Nokia
P&O Nedlloyd
Penrith Lakes Development Corp
Philips Electronics Australia
Scandinavian Airlines Systems
SBS
State Street Australia
Sydney Water
Ten Network
Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation
Visions of Australia
Wallenius Wilhelmsen

Donors

Stephen Grantand Bridget Pirrie,
GrantPirrie Gallery
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 11 Corporate & supporting Members

Corporate Members
at 30 June 2002

Commodores

Contship Containerlines Ltd

Captains

Adstream Marine
Art Exhibitions Australia Limited
Asiaworld Shipping Service
Association of Consulting Engineers Australia
Bulk Consultants Pty Ltd
DRAGOCO Australia Pty Ltd
DSTO – Aeronautical & Maritime Research
Ebsworth & Ebsworth
HMAS Albatross Welfare Fund
HMAS Harman Welfare Fund
HMAS Kuttabul
HMAS Vampire Association
HMAS Waterhen
HMAS Watson Welfare Fund
LOPAC Pty Ltd
Maritime Union of Australia CNSW Branch
Maritime Workers of Australia Credit Union Ltd
Mediterranean Shipping Company
Middle Harbour Yacht Club
Moreton Hire Service
Mortgage Asset Management Pty Ltd
Naval Association of Australia
Officers’ Mess Randwick Barracks
PMI Mortgage Insurance Ltd
Seawise Australia P/L
Sydney Sea Pilots Pty Ltd
Sydney Ports Corporation
Thales Underwater Systems Pty Ltd
The Smith’s Snackfood Company
Zim Shipping Australasia

Supporting Members and HMAS Sydney Appeal donations.
(donation $100 and over)

Mrs L M Albert $200.00
Mr J. Allbeury & Ms S Chaffey $100.00
Mr Asmus $100.00
Mr P G Bailey $200.00
Mr M Bennett $100.00
Mrs A R Berry $100.00
Mr & Mrs C & M Bethwaite $100.00
Mr M J Binnie $140.00
Mr G Blackburne $100.00
Mr R J Blandford $225.00
Mr P Boland $200.00
Mr & Mrs L & B Booth $140.00
Mr & Mrs D & J Boult $125.00
Mr R E Bowman $150.00
Mr R J Brown $100.00
Mr P J Bruce $500.00
Mr Bryan $125.00
Bulk Consultants Pty Ltd $100.00
Mr R Bunting $150.00
Cdre I M Burnside $100.00
Mr D Calmyre $200.00
Mr D Campbell AM $100.00
Mrs M Carter $135.00
Mr R S Chandler $300.00
Mr K Chapman $200.00
Mr D W Clancy $100.00
Mrs F Clifton $100.00
Mr K D Colless $100.00
Mr B F Collins $100.00
Mr S Collins $100.00
Mr A B Colvin $245.00
Mr P Cumes $100.00
Mr & Mrs J & P Davis $200.00
Mr M Doyle $250.00
Mr P V Fleming $145.00
Mr P Flick $100.00
Dr Foster $100.00
Mr & Mrs A & A Fox $100.00
Mr J E Gibson $400.00
Mr D C Glasson $100.00
C L W Goodridge $200.00
Mr J Hamilton $100.00
Mr K J Hamilton $100.00
Mr I M Hansen $500.00
Capt R W Hart $500.00
Mr S I Haviland $200.00
The Hon R Hawke & Miss B d’Alpuget $100.00
Mr B Henderson $100.00
Rev W K Hoekstra $100.00
Mr Robert Inns $100.00
Mr & Mrs M & S Johnson $225.00
Mr S Jones $165.00
Mr K S Kilmore $150.00
Mr R Lambrecht $100.00
Mr & Mrs M & E Latchford $100.00
Mr L W L Compte $100.00
Mr A G Lee AM OAM $100.00
Mr M Dougall AC $150.00
Mr G J MacMahon $145.00
Mr I A Macpherson $100.00
Mr R Malin $100.00
Mr P L Maxwell $200.00
Mr W. R McComas $125.00
Mr A McIntyre $100.00
Mr J C Messenger $100.00
Mr E A Moncrieff $100.00
Miss E More $100.00
Mr & Mrs R & S Murphy $140.00
Mr J Newman $100.00
Mr T Norby $102.06
Mrs E Nordstrom $100.00
Mr & Mrs D & K O’Meley $100.00
Mr J D O’Toole $125.00
Ms V Packer $100.00
Mr A F Pain $105.00
Mr K Pardoe $100.00
Ms A Parry $100.00
Mr I. Pattison $150.00
Mr & Mrs C & D Peterson $100.00
Mr G Pickett $125.00
Mr G W Quayle $195.00
Mr M L Rathbone $200.00
Mr M O Reynolds $200.00
Mr S Ridland $100.00
Mr & Mrs D & T Rogers $100.00
Mr & Mrs M & R Sampson $500.00
Mr D Sanders $100.00
Mr S Sasse $100.00
Mr E Scardifield $100.00
Mr I Serisier $100.00
Dr J Seymour $150.00
Mr & Mrs G & L Smolders $125.00
Mr J Southwell $100.00
CMDR Stanbury RANR $100.00
Mr & Mrs H & P Stevens $140.00
Mr P Stroethoff &
Mrs B Rintoul $150.00
Mr A D Sturgess $100.00
Mr & Mrs M & A Syme $100.00
Mr B Thompson $200.00
P A Thompson $200.00
Mr R J Torrington $100.00
Mr J Turnbull $100.00
Mr & Mrs T &
D Vaarzow-Morel $100.00
Mr S Walker $100.00
Mr P J Watts $150.00
Mr D Wedekind $1,000.00
Mr & Mrs J & J Wenden $100.00
Dr A C S Winkworth $100.00
Mr A C Witten $100.00
 
 

APPENDIX 12 MMAPSS grants 2001–2002

This year a record 16 grants totalling $35,055 have been awarded to maritime heritage organisations in the annual Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS), jointly funded by the ANMM and the Commonwealth Government’s Distributed National Collection Program.

Armfield Slipway & Boatshed, SA: $4,000 for restoration of wooden riverboat Lotus, built in 1910 at Goolwa. Lotus was a family pleasure boat and working vessel moving small sheep and cattle barges around the property. In the 1920s she was used as a hearse to transport the original owner’s coffin from the homestead to Renmark for burial. Traditional steam-bent ribs will be attached with copper nails and roves to the existing sound planking and to new planking fitted where required, and the hull will be caulked. Lotus will join the Armfield Slipway’s fleet of boats.

Bunbury Timber Jetty Preservation Society, WA: $2,000 to develop an education resource for secondary schools in the Greater Bunbury district, and to heighten awareness of the Bunbury Timber Jetty. A section of the jetty has recently been re-opened to the public by the society, which wants to raise awareness of its significance. The project will help schoolchildren to understand and appreciate their heritage, and give teachers a local alternative for excursions. A higher profile for the jetty will encourage community ‘ownership’ and voluntary assistance for its restoration.

Cape Byron Trust, NSW: $2,500 towards the development of a Cape Byron lightstation maritime museum, for establishing an interpretative display of heritage artefacts acquired in the archival acquisition funded by a 1999–2000 MMAPSS grant. A collection of maritime artefacts related to the operation of the lighthouse will be cleaned, stored, arranged and labelled. The collection will be presented in the southern room of the Cape Byron Lighthouse which has been set aside for this purpose.

Clarence River Historical Society, NSW: $2,000 to conserve a diving outfit in the collection of the oldest historical society in country NSW, established in 1931. The society holds an extensive collection of maritime photographs, paintings, ship memorabilia and a library containing rare books. The Siebe diving helmet and canvas suit, together with a hand pump, are fine examples of the early diving equipment used in wharf and bridge construction, and laying water mains across the river.

Coffs Harbour Historical Society & Museum, NSW: $3,000 for collation and preservation of a collection of old maritime history films by professional film makers. Subjects include South Solitary Island in the 1930s, the port, timber, shipping and maritime matters. Film and photographs will be copied to video and prints to preserve originals affected by vinegar viruses. A professional film producer will assist with editing and narrating. The film will benefit schoolchildren and the many visitors to Coffs Harbour.

Devonport Maritime Museum & Historical Society, Tasmania: $1,000 to complete the refurbishment of the original Mersey Maritime Board Signal Station, and provide interpretative signage and an educational kit. The station played an important role in the port of Devonport. The project will enhance the appearance of the museum and its surrounds and will be a drawcard for visitors, increasing their knowledge and appreciation of local maritime heritage. The station will provide hands-on experience in the protocol of flag care and communications for Navy cadets and other organisations.

Dominican Sisters of Eastern Australia & The Solomon Islands, NSW: $1,000 for conservation and copying of a journal about the Dominican Sisters’ voyage to Australia on the Martha Birnie in 1867. The project aims to have photos made for exhibition and to prepare a kit which can be used to enhance the storytelling. The conserved diary will be copied and transcribed onto CDs for preservation, exhibition and presentations.

Illawarra Military Heritage Society Inc, Breakwater Battery Military Museum, NSW: $1,500 to manage and display the museum’s collection of naval artefacts. The project includes an assessment of the conservation and storage needs of the collection of RAN and RN memorabilia, and the establishment of an exhibition space dealing with Naval history with emphasis on links to the Illawarra region. The display will complement the proposed Port Kembla Maritime Museum.

Maritime Museum of Tasmania: $2,000 to improve access and storage of a significant collection of 100 ship models. The museum is now focusing on organising the collections and improving documentation procedures. Work on the project includes research and documentation for a database, digitally photographing the models and moving them to a working area visible to the public. A conservation workshop will be run for volunteers and the skills acquired will be used to box all stored models.

Mid-North Coast Maritime Museum, NSW: $2,000 funding has been provided to assist with the cost of restoration of MV Goniemah, a 10.97 m (36 ft) timber launch built in 1948. Goniemah will be returned to full operation in NSW Waterways survey. The vessel will be hauled out at the museum’s slipway and small shipyard for a total review of the hull, cabins, mechanical and electric systems to determine the scope of preservation needed. Maintenance will be undertaken by retirees and tourists, providing social benefits as well as income for the museum when the vessel makes passenger trips on the Hasting River.

Richmond River Historical Society, NSW: $2,205 for preservation and display of the society’s maritime collection. Lismore was the head of navigation on the north arm of the Richmond River, now known as Wilsons River. This project will help preserve the society’s collection of artefacts, photographs and newspaper clippings and provide greater access to the material, which covers an important period of Lismore’s history. An interpretative display will feature the Port of Lismore and use of Wilsons River.

Runnymede Committee, National Trust of Tasmania: $2,000 towards the production of an illustrated guide book, Runnymede’s Maritime Heritage. Runnymede, built c 1840 and originally called Cairn Lodge, is a substantial Georgian home which has been operated as a house museum by the National Trust of Tasmania since 1965. Its third owner was a prominent master mariner and whaler, Captain Charles Bayley, who named it Runnymede after one of his whaling vessels. The guidebook will describe the link between Runnymede and the maritime history of Tasmania, documenting the maritime components of the house collection.

Sydney Heritage Fleet, NSW: $1,750 for conservation of glass plate negatives. Sydney Heritage Fleet holds glass plate negative collections of 19th and 20th-century sailing ships and Burns Philp ships which were involved in plantation operations. The photos will be printed to facilitate cataloguing and research, which will also help to preserve the glass plates by limiting their exposure to damage by handling.

Whale World, WA: $2,000 to produce an educational package about the Cheynes Beach Whaling Station, scene of the last commercial whaling in Australia until its closure in 1978. The station was of major importance not only to Albany but the whole country. Whale World has over 4,000 students visiting each year. The education package will enhance their experience and be available to students and teachers worldwide on the Internet.

Whyalla Maritime Museum, SA: $3,000 to assist restoration of the fishing vessel Valkyrie, one of the oldest surviving sea-going wooden boats in South Australia. The boat served along this coast until 1998 and represents an important part of the state’s maritime history. Valkyrie has been purchased for a new exhibition which will feature the life of ordinary seamen, their skills and duties, fishing and boat building.

Wooden Boat Guild of Tasmania: $3,100. Of the hundreds of boats built since European settlement only a handful remain, generally in poor condition. Terra Linna, a Huon pine yacht built in 1880, is a rare example of local design requirements. Funding will will be used for research on the Terra Linna and will produce interpretative information to be handed over to the Maritime Museum of Tasmania.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 13 Organisation chart as at 30 June 2002

APPENDIX 14 Staffing
 
Staff years (actual) 1999–2000 2000–2001 2001–2002
  95.0 101.0 99.6

 

Staffing overview

As at 30 June 2002, staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999 totalled 113
(83 ongoing full-time, 13 ongoing part-time, 9 non-ongoing full-time and 8 non-ongoing part-time).
 
Staff by gender
1999–2000
2000–2001
2001–2002
  male female male female male female
Senior Mment (EL 2)
4
1
5
0
4
0
Middle Mment(Sect Head)
5
10
6
10
6
11
Others
41
54
44
50
43
49
Totals
50
65
55
60
53
60

 

Branch staff
 
  1999–2000 2000–2001 2001–2002
Executive/Secretariat 2 2 19
Collections & Exhibitions 62 63 46
Commc. & Visitor Serv. 24 23 23
Corporate Services 27 27 25
Total 115 115 113

 

Salaries
 
 
1999–2000
2000–2001
2001–2002
Executive/Secretariat
$233,616
$247,774
$1,320,530
Collections & Exhibitions
$2,640,428
$2,685,076
$2,561,936
Commercial & Visitor Services
$1,253,374
$1,163,662
$1,168,458
Corporate Services
$1,320,757
$1,404,898
$1,330,863
Total
$5,448,075
$5,501,410
$6,381,787

 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 15 Council members
 
 

Chairman

Mr Mark Bethwaite
Term: 30 June 2001–29 June 2004
Attended all Council Meetings
A member of the Australian yachting teams for three Olympic Games, World Champion in a number of classes and 1982 Australian Yachtsman of the Year, Mark Bethwaite is currently Managing Director and CEO of the leading business lobby group, Australian Business Limited. An engineer by training, he has held high-level executive and board positions in the Australian mining industry. Current directorships include the Business Council of Australia and the Reserve Bank of Australia. He was the Prime Minister’s representative on the NSW Government Olympics Business Roundtable from 1997.

Members

Mr Marcus Blackmore AM (NSW)
Term: 22 November 2000–21 November 2003
Attended four Council Meetings
Chairman of Blackmores Ltd (a family company in cosmetics and vitamins), Mr Blackmore is a former director of the Waterways Authority and also director of the Committee for the Economic Development of Australia (CEDA). He is currently a member of the Industry Advisory Panel of the National Marine Safety Committee as well as the Young Endeavour Youth Scheme. An experienced yachtsman, Mr Blackmore’s company sponsored Kay Cottee’s solo voyage in 1988.

Mr Richard Bunting (Vic)
Term: 20 November 1996–19 November 1999
15 December 1999–14 December 2002
Attended four Council Meetings
Mr Bunting is currently a partner of Blake Dawson Waldron (Melbourne). He has extensive experience as a legal adviser and industrial advocate within the stevedoring and maritime industries sector.

Ms Cecilia Caffery (NSW)
Term: 9 August 1995–8 August 1998
9 December 1998–8 December 2001
Attended two Council Meetings
Ms Caffery has expertise in marketing and management and is patron of the museum’s Volunteers Program. An active sailor who has participated in Sydney–Hobart yacht races, she played a key role in developing the women’s sailing organisation, Women on the Water, in 1991.

Mr John Farrell (WA)
Term: 2 June 1997–29 June 2000
29 August 2000–28 August 2003
Attended all Council Meetings
Mr Farrell, a mechanical engineer by profession, is a marine consultant and has strong business experience in the marine area. He was formerly CEO of ship builder Oceanfast Marine Group.

The Hon Brian Gibson AM (Tas)
Term: 26 Jun3 2002-25 June 2005
Attended one Council Meeting
Brian Gibson was a Liberal Senator for Tasmania from 1993 until February 2002. In 1996, he was parliamentary secretary to the treasurer and responsible for corporations law and the Australian Securities Commission. Before entering Parliament, he was managing director of Australian Newsprint Mills Ltd during the 1980s, chairman of the Hydro-Electric Commission of Tasmania 1988–1992, chairman of Unitas Consulting Ltd, and a director of several other companies. He is a director of Concept Systems International Ltd and a member of the board of ‘Intelligent Island’ project in Tasmania.

Mr John Kirby (ACT) (deceased)
Term: 20 November 1996–19 November 1999
15 December 1999–14 December 2002
Attended two Council Meetings
Mr Kirby was the chairman of the Australian National University Investment Advisory Committee. He was also a director of several companies engaged in property investment, manufacturing, residential land development, and other business, equity and company investments. Mr Kirby passed away on 8 April 2002.

Mr Bruce McDonald (SA)
Term: 30 June 1997–29 June 2000
29 August 2000–28 August 2003
Attended all Council Meetings
Mr McDonald brings considerable business expertise to Council. A chartered civil engineer, urban planner and company director, he is currently chairman of the Macfield Group of Companies including Macfield Containers International Ltd, Australian Container Leasing Ltd and AusRail Operation Ltd.

Mrs Eda Ritchie (Vic)
Term: 26 June 2002–25 June 2005
Attended one Council Meeting
Coming from a farming and business background, Mrs Ritchie has had a strong community commitment mainly through local government, the Arts and as trustee of the R E Ross Philanthropic Trust. She is an active sailor and has worked in natural resource management and coastal strategic planning and was a member of Environment Conservation Council whose recommendations on marine parks have recently been adopted by the Victorian government. She is chairman of Rural Ambulance Victoria.

Mr Noel Robins OAM (WA)
Term: 9 December 1998–8 December 2001
26 June 2002–25 June 2005
Attended all Council Meetings (two as an observer)
Mr Robins is a commissioner of the Western Australian Waters & Rivers Commission and a board member of the Western Australian ParaQuad Association. He played a key management role in Australia’s defence of the America’s Cup in 1987 and is a two-ton world sailing and a former national sailing champion. He led the gold medal winning Sonar team in the 2000 Sydney Paralympic Games.

Mr John Simpson (VIC)
Term: 22 November 2000–21 November 2003
Attended three Council Meetings
Mr Simpson is group manager, External Affairs & Public Policy, with Shell. He was formerly parliamentary adviser with the Victorian State Parliament. Earlier in his career he was with the ABC as a journalist in finance and business affairs. Mr Simpson is currently a member of the Finance Committee of the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and member of the Olympics 2000 Steering Committee.

Ms Mary-Louise Williams (NSW)
Term: 9 November 2000–8 November 2003
Attended all Council Meetings
Ms Williams began her career at the National Maritime Museum as senior curator in 1988, then became assistant director responsible for the Collections and Exhibitions Branch. She has been part of the senior management team for ten years. She is on the board of the NSW Museums and Galleries Foundation. She was appointed director of the National Maritime Museum in November 2000 after 11 months as acting director.

Mrs Nerolie Withnall (Qld)
Term: 26 June 2002–25 June 2005
Attended one Council Meeting

Mrs Withnall is a consultant (former partner) with Minter Ellison lawyers. Her areas of expertise include commercial transaction, capital raisings, takeovers, corporate governance and underwriting. She is chairman of the Queensland Museum Board and is also a director with Campbell Brothers Group, Pan Australian Resources NL and Darling Downs Food Limited.

Naval Member

The naval member holds office at the pleasure of the chief of Navy.

RADM Kevin Scarce AM CSC RAN (Vic)
Term: 8 December 1999–
Attended four Council Meetings
RADM Scarce joined the RAN in 1968. He has trained and studied in the UK and Washington, and served on HMA Ships Vendetta, Yarra, Duchess, Watson, Perth and aircraft carrier Melbourne, and was commander of HMAS Cerberus in 1995. In 1993 he attended the National Defence University in Washington, DC, and in 1994 was awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross in the Australia Day Honours List for his services to Maritime Headquarters. In December 1999 he was promoted to rear admiral and in June 2001 was recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List with a medal in the Military Division.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 16 Council meetings & committees

There was a reduction in the number of committees and some membership changes after Council meeting No 61

2001–2002 meetings

Meeting No 60 – 19 September 2001
Meeting No 61 – 5 December 2001
Meeting No 62 – 27 February 2002
Meeting No 63 – 24 April 2002
Meeting No 64 – 27 June 2002

Audit Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:
Mr John Farrell / 2
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Others / attendance:
Mr Quentin Howarth ANMM (secretary) / 2
Ms Joan Miller ANMM / 2
Mr Aziz Dindar, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu / 1
Mr Rory O’Connor, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu / 1
Mr Graham Johnson, Australian National Audit Office / 2

Finance & Resources Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:
Ms Cecilia Caffery / 2
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Others / attendance:
Mr Quentin Howarth ANMM (secretary) / 2
Ms Joan Miller ANMM / 2

Finance, Resources & Audit Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:

Mr Richard Bunting / 2
Mr John Kirby / 1
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Mr Quentin Howarth ANMM (secretary) / 2
Ms Joan Miller ANMM / 2
Mr Graham Johnson, Australian National Audit Office / 2
Mr Aziz Dindar, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu / 2

Major Capital Works Committee

Met five times. Members / attendance:
Mr Richard Bunting / 2
Ms Cecilia Caffery / 2
Mr John Farrell / 5
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 5
Others / attendance:
Mr Quentin Howarth ANMM (secretary) / 4
Mr Rob Hall ANMM / 1
Mr Ian McKellar ANMM / 3
Ms Joan Miller ANMM / 5

Foundation Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:
Mr Marcus Blackmore / 1
Ms Cecilia Caffery / 2
Mr John Kirby / 1
Mr John Simpson / 1
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Others / attendance:
Mr Max Dingle ANMM (secretary) / 2
Mr Russell Smylie ANMM / 2

Sponsorship Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:
Mr Marcus Blackmore / 1
Mr John Farrell / 2
Mr Bruce McDonald / 2
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Others / attendance:
Mr Max Dingle ANMM (secretary) / 2

Marketing & Programs Committee

Met two times. Members / attendance:
Mr Richard Bunting / 1
Ms Cecilia Caffery / 2
Mr John Simpson / 1
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 2
Others / attendance:
Mr Max Dingle ANMM (secretary) / 2

Marketing, Programs & Sponsorship Committee

Met three times. Members / attendance:

Mr Marcus Blackmore / 3
Mr John Simpson / 1
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 3
Others / attendance:

Mr Max Dingle ANMM (secretary) / 3

Collections & Exhibitions Committee

Met five times. Members / attendance:
Mr Noel Robins / 5
Mr John Simpson / 2
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 5
Others / attendance:
Mr Michael Crayford ANMM (secretary) / 5

Fleet Committee

Met five times. Members / attendance:
Mr Bruce McDonald / 2
Mr Noel Robins / 1
RADM Kevin Scarce / 5
Ms Mary-Louise Williams / 5
Others / attendance:
Mr Michael Crayford ANMM (secretary) / 1
Mr Russell Smylie ANMM (secretary) / 4

Mr Steven Adams ANMM / 5

USA Gallery Consultative
Committee

Met once. Members / attendance:
Ms Eilleen Malloy US Consul General, co-chair / 1
Ms Mary-Louise Williams, co-chair / 1
Mr David Gilmour US Consulate / 1
Mr Paul Hundley ANMM (secretary) / 1
Others / attendance:
Mr Michael Crayford ANMM / 1
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 17 Australian National Maritime Foundation
 
 

Chairman

Bill Cutbush
Company Director

Directors

Mark Bethwaite
Managing Director & CEO, Australian Business Limited; Chairman, Australian National Maritime Musuem

Tas Bull
Former National Secretary Australian Waterside Workers Federation.

Peter Collins QC MP
Former State Opposition Leader and Commander in the Naval Reserve

John Evans AM
Former Councillor,
Australian National Maritime Museum

Trevor Haworth
Executive Chairman, Captain Cook Cruises

Rob Mundle
Author and Journalist

Mary-Louise Williams
Director, Australian National Maritime Museum

Secretary

Russell Smylie
Australian National Maritime Museum

Kay Cottee AO
Record-making solo sailor; former Chairman,
Australian National Maritime Museum

Peter Dexter
Regional Director,
Wallenius Wilhelmsen
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 18 APS Staff at 30 June 2002

This Appendix lists only APS staff employed under The Public Service Act 1999

Executive

Mary-Louise Williams MA Director
Samantha McDonough BACom Executive Assistant
Russell Smylie BBus Manager, Secretariat & Fleet Services

Fleet

Steven Adams EngCl2 BBus CertMusStud CertMarEng
  CertIndElect ASA Fleet Manager
Neil Brough EngCl1 DipNavArch DipMarEng
  CertMusStud Fleet Engineer Superintendent
Bob Parish JP Coxswain CertElect Shipyard Foreman
Peter Scutts JP CertShpbldg AIEA MSEA Operations Officer
Lee Graham Coxswain CertShpbldg Shipwright
Matthew Dunn CertShpbldg Shipwright
Todd Maiden CertBlrmkg Shipwright
Matthew Spillard CertFitMchng Shipwright
Michael Whetters Shipwright
Vince McGuire Shipkeeper
George Hannaford JP CertShpbldg ASTC Shipkeeper
Christine Finlay Shipkeeper
Noel Burgess Shipkeeper
Peter Lightbody Coxswain CertBlrmkg Shipkeeper

External Relations Unit

William Richards BA DipJourn DipPubAdmin Media & Communications Manager
Emma Fitzgerald BATS Promotions Assistant

Collections & Exhibitions Branch

Michael Crayford MA GradDipMusStud BA
  (Visual Arts) Assistant Director
Bliss Jensen BA BSc DipPR Project Assistant

Special Projects Unit

Mariea Fisher BA(Hons) Manager, Temporary & Travelling Exhibitions
Susan Sedgwick MA Curator, Temporary & Travelling Exhibitions
Paul Hundley MA Senior Curator, USA Gallery
John Waight Cert Ed Indigenous Curator & Liaison Officer

Maritime Communities

Patricia Miles MA GradDipMusStud A/g Senior Curator
Penny Cuthbert BA DipMusStud A/g Curator, Economic & Commercial History
Helen Trepa MA DipMusStud Curator, Maritime Communities
Daina Fletcher BA(Hons) On leave

Maritime Technology, Exploration & Navy

Lindsey Shaw BA DipMusStud Senior Curator
Martin Terry BA(Hons) Curator, Exploration
Kieran Hosty BA DipMarArch Curator, Ship Technology & Maritime Archaeology
Michelle Linder MA GradDipMusStud Curator, Navy

Conservation

Karen Coote BA BSc (Hons) Head of Conservation
Robert Clendon BAppSc Senior Conservator
Sue Frost AssDipMatCon Senior Conservator
Elizabeth Hadlow BAppSc Conservator
Stephen Jackson BAppSc Conservator
Carolyn Murphy BA BAppSc GradDipMusStud Conservator
Jolanta Grzedzielska MA Conservator
Sarah Slade BAppSc MBA On leave

Registration

Sally Fletcher BA DipMusStud Senior Registrar
Denise MacKenzie MA DipMusStud Registrar, Information Management & Loans
Andy Atkins Registrar, Storage & Transport
Will Mather BA(Hons) DipMusStud Assistant Registrar, Documentation
Simon Hawkes BA CHM Assistant Registrar, Documentation
Claire Campey BA DipMusStud Registration Assistant, Documentation
Matthew Ryan BA (Visual) MA Registration Assistant, Storage & Handling
Andrew Frolows Cert Photo Photographer
Amanda McKittrick Photographic Librarian

Design

Susan Weir BID AD Manager
Natasha Galea BSc (Arch) BDes (Hons) Graphic Designer/Coordinator
Daniel Ormella MDes AssDipGraphDes Graphic Designer
Lisa Carrington BDes Graphic Designer
Johanna Nettleton BA Exhibition Designer
Irene Scortis BDes Exhibition Designer
Stephen Crane BVA Senior Preparator
Kevin Bray GradDipVisArts Team Leader, Preparation
Wayne Snowdon BA MVA Preparator
Adam Laerkesen BA Preparator

Library Services

Frances Prentice BA(LibSc) Manager
Jan Harbison BA GradDipLib Technical Services Librarian
Helen Phillips CertLib Library Technician
Gillian Simpson BA DipLib Public Enquiries
 
 

Commercial & Visitor Services Branch

Max Dingle Assistant Director
Viean Richardson BA Marketing Assistant

Visitor Programs

Dianne Fenton BA DipEd Manager
Chris Waugh BA(Hons) Public Programs Coordinator
Dallas Bicknell BA(Hons) DipEd Public Programs Officer
Jeannie Douglass MA DipEd School Programs Coordinator
Jeffrey Fletcher DipTeach K-6 School & Programs Coordinator
Carolyn Allen BEd Education Project Officer
Patricia Simmons Kids Deck Public Programs Officer

Kerrena Worrad BA DipEd Project Officer

Customer Services

Peter Haggarty JP Manager
Xanthe Kerr Assistant Manager
Jan McInnies Receptionist

Marketing

Susan Bridie Manager
Dominic Mackintosh BA Marketing Services Manager
Adrian Adam BBus Members Manager
Christina Nielson BA Members Service Coordinator
Fran Atkins Venue Manager
Robin Archer MA DipEd DipMediaStud DipMusStud Welcome Wall Administrator

Natasha Clark BA Evaluation & Visitor Research Officer
Fran Mead On leave

Publishing

Jeffrey Mellefont BA DipEd Manager
Simonne Brill BA DipMusStud Publishing Assistant

Corporate Services Branch

Quentin Howarth Assistant Director
Berri Shelley JP AssocDipBus Project Assistant

Communications & Information Management Services

Dianne Churchill BA(Hons) DipEd DipIM Manager
Robyn Gurney BA DipEd MIM Records Manager
Fifi Brown DipTeach BEd Records Officer
Gavin Pawsey Audio/Visual Technician
Ngaire O’Leary Assoc Dip Comm Audio/Visual Technician
Mark Newland Audio/Visual Technician
Vivien Showyin Audio/Visual Technician

Finance

Joan Miller BCom ACA CPA Manager
William Good BA Assistant Finance Manager
James Egan Accounts Officer
Tina Lee Accounts Officer
Tony Ridgway BA Accounts Officer

Human Resources

Gillian Matthews BAppSc Manager
John Miranda BA JP Manager, Personnel Services
Peter Wood MasterMariner MAqua DipVolMg Volunteers Manager
Cindy Fung DipHRM Personnel Officer
Brendan Jackson L/SMet AOM Assistant Personnel Officer
Meredith Mitchell DipBus Volunteers Assistant
Michelle Durant BSc On leave

Building Services

Ray McMaster DipEng AssocDipConMaint Manager
Keith Buckman A/g Contracts/Purchasing Officer
Barry Ashcroft On leave

Property Liaison

Ian McKellar AssocDipConMaint Manager
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 19 Volunteers 2001–2002

Warwick Abadee
Arnold Abicht
Steve Adamantidis
Don Aggar
Ena Alcorn
Alan Anderson
Del Anderson
Lilian Andrew
Grant Arbuthnot
Gwen Ashcroft
Barry Astle
Pat Austin
Judith Aymes-Smith
Kay Baldock
Vivian Balmer
Toni Barker
Alen Barrett
Howard Bate
Wendy Bate
Lyndyl Beard
Ilsa Beaumont
Ian Beckett
Carey Bell
Colin Bell
David Bell
Estelle Billing
John Bird
John Bishop
John Blanchfield
Wim Blome
David Bloom
Judy Bloom
Gwen Bonnefin
Jim Bonnefin
Alex Books
Philip Bopf
David Boult
David Boulton
Colin Bowes
Kel Boyd
Gus Braun
Bob Bright
John Brooke
Mary Brookes
Norm Brooks
Bernie Brown
Cameron Brown
Deanne Brown
Merv Brown
John Buckland
Tom Buckley
Pam Burden
John Burn
John L Butler
Ian Campbell
John Campbell
Lisa Campbell
Jim Campion
Jack Carroll
Marion Carter
Napanan Chaisuwan
Janice Chan
Winnie Chan
Paul Cheng
Bill Cheyne
Victor Chiang
Leslie Church
Charles Clancy
Geoff Clarke
Helen Clift
Brian Clough
Jim Colvin
John Connor
Sylvia Cordiner
Michelle Corpuz
Mary Correa
John Corry
Don Coulter
Reg Craft
Shirlea Crook
Patricia Cullen
Owen Cunliffe
Tom Dalton
Allan Dangerfield
Bert Danon
Stuart Davis
Caroline Davy
Pieter de Rooy
Ken Deere
Phillip Denholm
Jim Dennis
Jim Dillon
John Dillon
Vincent Dorahy
Roy Dow
Samuel Dow
Michael Duffett
Anthony Duignan
Jean Dunworth
John Eager
John Ebner
Brian Edwards
Derrick Ee
Andrew Ellis
John Emdin
Jean Emmerson
Jeff Evans
Ken Fair
Jeannie Fea
Jeanette Felton
John Ferrall
Diane Finlay
Geoffrey Francis
Ted Franken
Roy Freere
Barry Fregon
Chanel Friend
Ken Fung
Jim Furlong
Bryan Gale
Mervyn Gallagher
Aileen-Lee Gardner
Noreen-Lee Gardner
Peter Gerrey
John Gibbins
Tony Gibbs
John Gidney
Stephen Gillis
Kathryn Glasgow
Peter Goertz
Brad Golding
David Golding
Robert Goode
Michele Gray
Robert Guest
Leslie Gulliver
Joy Halstead
George Hancock
Gordon Hannam
Shirley Hannam
Ted Hannon
Brian Hansford
Joy Hanson-Acason
Wendy Hardiman
Dorothy Harpley
Brian Harris
Evelyn Harris
Jane Harris
Keith Harrison
Chris Harry
Bob Hetherington
Ken Heylbut
Shirley Heywood
Susan Hiblen
Bill Hill
Frank Hines
John Hodges
Clive Hoffman
Mal Horsfall
Ziggy Hort
Warwick Howse
May Hu
Charles Hughes
Don Humphrey
Jack Hutchinson
Penny Hyde
Warren Hyslop
Lynne Jacobson
Derek James
Jim Jeans
Ian Jenkins
John Jewell
D’Arcy Johnson
John Johnson
John Jones
David Kane
Mavis Keevers
Robyn Keevers
Salley Kelly
Keith Kennedy
John Kent
Richard Keyes
Bob Killingsworth
Joan Killingsworth
John King
Colin Kline
Lewis Klipin
Alfred Knight
Sylvia Kratz
Aye Aye Kyaw Zin
Alex Lange
Bill Langlois
Roger Langsworth
Amy Laurence
Maureen Law
Shane Lawrie
David Leach
Derek Lewis
Adele Lucas
David Luff
Paul Maile
Peter Maile
Francoise Maingard
Shane Mangan
George Manning
Terry Manning
Derek Mansfield
John Marsh
Stephen Martin
Robert Matchett
Casimiro Mattea
Roy Matthews
John Maxwell
Jack McBurney
Colleen McDonell
Robert McGeorge
Frank McHale
Lyn McHale
Robert McInally
Ronald McJannett
Geoff McKeown
Sheila McLean
Ken McRorie
Lynn McWilliams
Allan Meddings
John Mees
Peter Mellor
Bruce Miller
Harry Miller
Ron Miller
George Milne
Byron Mitchell
Danielle Mitchell
Raymond Mobbs
Tony Mockler
Clare Moloney
Myles Mooney
David C Moore
David H Moore
Elizabeth More
Barry Moscrop
Brian Moules
Hugo Muianga
Ross Muller
Valda Muller
Emma Mulvaney
Michelle Munro
Alwyn Murray
Keith Murray
Rod Musch
Alexis Nagy
Brian Nash
John Newlyn
Chiu Ng
James Nguyen
Jonathan Nicholl
Tony Noakes
Clem O’Donoghue
John O’Grady
Eric Olufson
Arthur Ongley
Henno Orro
Len Oudenryn
John Palmer
Bob Parker
Jenny Patel
Anne Patterson
Warren Peachman
Gervase Pearce
Patrick Perry-Bolt
Brian Peters
Godfrey Phillips
Trevor Pickering
Paul Pisani
Shirley Pitman
Richard Pocock
Len Price
Janice Pritchard
Peter Puckeridge
Helen Puddick
Fran Rabbitts
Suma Rajanna
Alexandra Ralston
Judith Randall
Philip Rattray
Ken Raven
Greg Rawson
Leonard Regan
Alfred Reitano
Phil Rennie
Mayra Restgo
Judith Roach
Christopher Robertson
Dorothy Robinson
Gordon Robinson
Janet Robinson
Don Robson
Henry Roda
Stuart Rodwell
Graham Roe
Ab Rootliep
John Rosenblum
Barney Ross
Peter Rossiter
Gwyn Rothwell
Sarah Ruapuna
Teata Ruapuna
Geoff Ruggles
Kathleen Ruggles
Harald Ruzicka
Terry Ryan
Casey Schreuder
Wim Schroder
Keith Schwartz
Peter Sellars
John Shaw
Kenneth Sherwell
Richard Sims
John Skidmore
Brian Skingsley
John Slade
Grahame Small
Joy Smart
Gerry Smith
Ian Smith
M Ruth Smith
Richard Smith
Roger Smith
Eric Spooner
Barry Squires
Tony Starling
John Steel
Barbara Stein
Verlie Stevenson
Max Surman-Smith
Vera Taylor
Theo ten Brummelaar
Robert Thaler
Bruce Tindale
Natalia Tjahjono
Geoffrey Tonkin
Victor Treleaven
Guy Tuplin
Jan van den Broek
David van Kool
Bill Vanneck
Alf Vincent
Allan Walker
John Walker
Roy Walker
Derek Walsh
Ken Ward
Annette Waterworth
Bert Waterworth
Gerry Weber
Joanne Wenban
Reuben Wesek
John Weston
Jeannette Wheildon
Janet Wierzbicki
Eric Willcock
Herman Willemsen
David Williams
Norman Wilson
Peter Wilson
Crystal Xia
Victor Zonca
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 20 Volunteer speakers panel

Rotary Club of Bondi Junction 11/07/2001 Warwick Abadee

St Helen’s Community Centre 13/08/2001 John Bishop

Bankstown Historical Society 21/08/2001 Bob Matchett

Rotary Club, Baulkham Hills 28/08/2001 David Boult

Blue Mountains Family History Society 10/09/2001 Warwick Abadee

Rotary Club of Baulkham Hills 25/09/2001 David Boult

Probus Club Oatley 10/10/2001 Bob Matchett

UZA Australian History Discussion Group 17/10/2001 Bob Matchett

Association of Independent Retirees Ltd 19/10/2001 Warwick Abadee

IBM Quarter Century Club 15/10/2001 John Bishop

Sisters of St Joseph Aged Care Services Ltd 22/10/2001 John Bishop

Montefiore Retirement Home 11/11/2001 Warwick Abadee

Sutherland Branch of National Seniors Association 21/11/2001

Sir Moses Montefiore Retirement Home 13/01/2002 Warwick Abadee

Probus Club of Double Bay 21/01/2002 Warwick Abadee

St Joan of Arc Retirement Home 23/01/2002 John Bishop

Greenacre Combined Probus 01/02/2002 Bob Matchett

Menai Club 13/02/2002 Bob Matchett

B’nai B’nith Lodge 18/02/2002 Warwick Abadee

Rotary Club of Rose Bay 26/02/2002 John Blanchfield

Berowra Men’s Probus Club 01/03/2002 David Boult

Rotary Club of Hunters Hill 13/03/2002 John Bishop

Berowra Men’s Probus Club 07/03/2002 David Boult

The Order of the Eastern Star 27/03/2002 Bob Matchett

North Shore Harbour Watch Club 14/04/2002 Warwick Abadee

Rose Bay Probus Club 15/04/2002 Warwick Abadee

North Ryde Community Aid & Information Centre 23/05/2002 John Blanchfield

Penshurst Red Cross 03/06/2002 Bob Matchett

Haberfield Rotary 11/06/2002 Graeme Roe
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 21 Customer Service Charter

Our primary focus is to our visitors and other users of the museum and we aim at all times to provide high-quality external and internal service.

Who we are

We aim to be the prime cultural resource for developing the community’s knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s relationship with its waterways and the sea. We will achieve this by:

• Providing the highest standards of service

• Generating the widest understanding and enjoyment of maritime history by creating exciting products and programs that inform and entertain

• Fostering the care and research of Australia’s cultural and material maritime heritage, in particular the National Maritime Collection

• Enhancing the level of recognition of the museum as a dynamic cultural institution.

Who are our customers?

As a national museum we serve the whole Australian community, but in particular our visitors, schools, researchers and historians, other cultural, government and commercial organisations, community groups, Members, sponsors, users of our venues and other services.
We also represent Australia internationally, and welcome many overseas visitors. Our internal ‘customers’ include volunteers, colleagues, contractors and service providers.

What we provide

• An accessible maritime cultural heritage resource, developed and maintained to the highest professional standards.

• Relevant exhibitions and programs that educate, entertain, and reflect community needs and values.

• Services extended as widely as possible throughout Australia and abroad.

Our service standards

The museum is committed to providing services to all its customers, both external and internal, in a way that is courteous, equitable, prompt, professional and ethical. To the fullest extent our resources allow, we will provide:

• Courteous, well-trained and knowledgable staff at all levels

• A safe, clean and accessible environment

• Quality services to all segments of our community

• Up to date information about our products and services

• Prompt, efficient and accurate responses to enquiries

• Opening hours that reflect community needs.

Tell us what you think

We welcome your suggestions for improving our services, and provide a variety of ways for you to communicate with us. We will pass your message to the person who can act on it, and aim to resolve any problems promptly. We are committed to regular museum user surveys and research to ensure we are meeting your needs.

Here are some of the ways you can communicate with us:

• Speak to a staff member in person. All staff, including the director and senior management, take turns attending the information desk.

• Complete the Comments Book in the museum foyer which is reviewed regularly and responded to where possible.

• Express your views on the subjects we feature in exhibitions at a discussion point in our galleries from time to time.

• Fill in a formal complaint form at our information desk.

• Contact our Customer Services manager on (02) 9298 3777 fax (02) 9298 3780.

• Write to us at GPO Box 5131 Sydney NSW 2000. We strive to reply within 14 days.

• Contact staff directly by phone, fax or email. Details from (02) 9298 3777, or visit us at 2 Murray St, Darling Harbour. Our web site at http://www.anmm.gov.au has direct email links to key staff.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 22 Statutory information requirements
 
 

Assessment of effectiveness in managing human resources

In addition to the next three items below, and a report in the Director’s Overview, see Appendix 13, 14 & 18.

Industrial democracy

The Joint Consultative Council comprising the director, assistant director Corporate Services, the Human Resources manager and three elected staff representatives met three times this year.

Occupational health and safety

See under human resource management, Key Result Area 1 program summary.

Workplace diversity

A Workplace Diversity Committee met on two occasions during the year. The museum is an equal opportunity employer. It appointed an Aboriginal to the position of Indigenous curator and liaison officer. See Appendix 14 for staff breakdown by gender.

Commonwealth disability strategy

The museum provides facilities to help disabled people to access its programs, exhibitions and publications. Work on the museum’s Disability Action Plan continues, along with development of performance measures. New initiatives reported in Section 2 Key Result Area 1 Program Summary.

Access & equity

In line with the Charter for Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Society the museum creates programs and products that reflect the diversity of Australian society.

Environmental performance

Management of energy consumption, for which the museum has won awards in the past, was ongoing. This is undertaken by the Building Services section which has also targeted waste management as an issue for ongoing review (see Key Result Area 1).

Corporate governance

Names of senior executives appear in Appendixes 13 & 18. Senior management committees, including Audit Committee, appear in Appendix 16. Triennial Strategic Plans are prepared and are addressed by annual business plans. Section 2 of this report specifically reports performance to the current Strategic Plan 2000–2003, tabled in June 2000. Ethical standards are in line with APS guidelines and are subject to normal scrutiny.

Developments in external scrutiny

There were no developments, significant or otherwise, in external scrutiny.

Reports by the Auditor General

None undertaken during the period other than for Financial Statements.

Fraud control

No matters were referred for investigation.

Consultants

Providers of knowledge-based services who were paid over $15,000 in 2001–2002 numbered 21, in areas that included architecture, engineering, management consulting, information technology, finance, OHS, personnel and exhibition development. Expenditure was approximately $1,540,000. Excluded from this definition are contractors providing trade and technical services, among others. Details of all consultancies and contractors are available to Members of Parliament and Senators on request.

Advertising & market research

This information is contained in the section Key Result Area 4.

Freedom of information

There were no requests under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 23 List of Acts administered

The museum was established by the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 (No 90 of 1990), where its functions and powers are set out. The Act was amended in the Arts, Sport, Environment, Tourism and Territories Legislation Amendment (No 2) Act 1991 (No 179 of 1991), principally to provide for a Naval member of Council.

The Australian National Maritime Museum Regulations (Statutory Rules 1991 No 10) under Section 54 of the Act were signed by the Governor-General on 29 January 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 5 February 1991.

The Regulations were amended (Statutory Rules 1991 No 220) by the Governor-General on 27 June 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 5 July 1991 and revised again (Statutory Rules 1991 No 348) on 4 November 1991, and notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 12 November 1991.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 24 Functions and powers of the minister

The museum is responsible to the Minister for Communications and the Arts. Key ministerial powers under the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 include the minister’s ability to:

• Transfer property, real or personal, held on lease or otherwise by the Commonwealth, to the museum for its use or for inclusion in the National Maritime Collection (Section 8)

• Approve criteria and guidelines for the National Maritime Collection (Section 8)

• Approve the disposal of material in the National Maritime Collection with value exceeding $20,000 (Section 10(4)(b), amended 1991)

• Give direction to the Council with respect to the performance of the functions or the exercise of the powers of the museum (Section 14)

• Appoint a member to act as chairperson of the Council or appoint a member of Council (for no more than 12 months) where there is a vacancy (Section 18)

• Convene a meeting of the Council at any time (Section 23)

• Approve and table in Parliament Strategic and Annual Operational Plans and variations to them (Sections 25-28)

• Approve leave of absence to the director on such terms or conditions as she or he determines (Section 34)

• Be advised in writing by the director of direct or indirect pecuniary interests (Section 37

• Appoint a person (not a member of Council)
to act as director during a vacancy with such appointment not to exceed 12 months
(Section 38)

• Approve the form of the museum’s estimates and the estimates (Section 46), and

• Approve contracts exceeding $250,000
(Section 47, amended 1991).
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 25 Functions and powers of the museum

The functions and powers of the museum are defined in Sections 6 and 7 of the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990.

Functions of the museum (Section 6)

• To exhibit, or make available for exhibition by others, in Australia or elsewhere, material included in the National Maritime Collection or maritime historical material that is otherwise in the possession of the museum.

• To cooperate with other institutions (whether public or private) in exhibiting, or in making available for exhibition, such material.

• To develop, preserve and maintain the National Maritime Collection.

• To disseminate information relating to Australian maritime history and information relating to the museum and its functions.

• To conduct, arrange for and assist research into matters relating to Australian maritime history.

• To develop sponsorship, marketing and other commercial activities relating to the museum’s functions.

Powers of the museum (Section 7) • To purchase, commission the creation of, lend, borrow or hire maritime historical material either in its own right or jointly with others.

• To collect material relating to Australian maritime history and dispose of that material under certain conditions.

• To recover or arrange for or assist in the recovery of maritime historical material from the Australian marine environment and from other areas.

• Accept gifts, devises, bequests and assignments of money or property whether as trustee or otherwise.

• Acquire and operate vessels anywhere, whether or not the vessels are maritime historical material.

• Disseminate information relating to Australian maritime history and sell replicas or reproductions of maritime historical material.

• Enter contracts, acquire, hold and dispose of real or personal property, charge fees (in addition to the charges fixed by regulation) appoint agents and attorneys and act as an agent for other persons, as well as raise money, by appropriate means for the purpose of the museum.
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 26 Director’s statement

The Australian National Maritime Museum is a Statutory Authority set up under the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 and responsible to the Minister for the Arts, the Hon Rod Kemp MP within the portfolio of the Minister for Communications, the Information Economy and the Arts (Senator Richard Alston).

This Annual Report, which reports on the second financial year of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s 2000–2003 Strategic Plan, has been prepared in compliance with the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies (CAC) Act 1997, and taking account of the Commonwealth and Companies (Report of Operations) Orders 2002. It has also been prepared in consultation with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsection 63(2) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Certain categories of information do not appear in full but are available to Members of Parliament and Senators on request.

Mary-Louise Williams
Director
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX 27 Index

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander see Indigenous issues

Accounting policies 50

Acts administered 111

Acquisitions 3, 6, 31, 75–83

Admission charges ii

Advertising 37, 39

ANZ Tall Gallery 6, 13

APS staff 102–105

Archaeology see maritime archaeology

Assa Abloy Australia Pacific 12, 91

Assets & liabilities 45, 57–61

Assets held in trust 67

Auditor General 42, 63, 110

Auditors, remuneration of 63

Australian Customs Service 12, 91

Australian Gold Council, The 13, 91

Australian Maritime Museums Council 90

Australian National Maritime Foundation iii, 6, 9, 69, 101

Appropriations 67

Batavia 5, 29

Blackmores Ltd 13, 91

Borrowing cost expense 56

Building services section 23, 96, 105

Calendar of events 71–75

Capital works 21, 23

Cash flow reconciliation 62

Cash flows, statement of 46

Chairman 98

Chairman’s message iii

Classic & Wooden Boat Festival 5, 16, 37, 38

Collections & Exhibitions branch 9, 25, 96, 102

Commercial & Visitor Services branch 10, 96, 104

Commitments, schedule of 47

Committees of Council 100–101

Communications & information section 22, 96, 105

Compliance with requirements 110, 112

Conference papers 87

Conservation section 32, 35, 96, 103

Contact officer ii

Contingencies, schedule of 48

Consultants 110

Corporate governance 110

Corporate Members 92

Corporate overview 2–9, 110

Corporate Services branch 9, 96, 105

Council 98–103

Council members, remuneration of 62

Curatorial sections 26–7, 96, 102–3

Customer feedback 23

Customer services section 21, 96, 104

Customer Service Charter 109

Delta / Aurion Gold 13, 91

Design section 96, 103

Director 4–11, 101, 102, 112

Director’s overview 4–11

Director’s statement 112

Distributed National Collection Program 8, 94

Donors 78

Endeavour, search for 9, 26

Education 4, 25, 28–29

Energy management 23, 110

Environmental performance 21, 110

Equity 45

Exhibitions (ANMM) 2, 5–7, 10, 12–17, 26, 27

Expenses 44, 55–6

External scrutiny 110

External relations unit 10, 96, 102

Extraordinary item 56

Federation, Centenary of – exhibitions 12

Federation, National Council for the Centenary of 12

Finance section 96, 105

Financial assets 57

Financial instruments 64–66

Financial statements 41–69

Financial performance, statement of 44

Financial position, statement of 45

Financing activities 46

Fleet section 9, 31, 35, 96, 103

Food at Sea Festival 2, 6, 15, 37

Fraud control 110

Freedom of information 110

Functions of the minister 111

Functions of the museum 112

Glossary N/A

GrantPirrie Gallery 32, 91

Grants 8, 94

Halvorsen Collection, Lars & Harold 3, 30, 31

Highlights of the year 2

HM Bark Endeavour Foundation 9

Howard Smith collection 31, 82

Human resources section 22, 97, 105, 96, 110

Independent audit report 42

Index 113

Indigenous issues 5, 7, 14, 26, 102

Industrial democracy 110

Information technology 22

Institution of Engineers Australia 13, 91

Interest bearing liabilities

Internal & external scrutiny 110

Internet 8, 22, 32, 37

Internship program 8

Investing activities 46

James Craig 17, 28, 29

John Louis 31

Key result areas 20–39

Krait, commando raider 33

Lectures 71, 87

Liabilities 45, 60

Library services 8, 32, 35, 96, 103

Louis Vuitton Fund 68

Maritime archaeology 9, 9, 12, 26, 27, 28

Maritime communities section 96

Maritime technology, exploration & navy section 96

Market research 37, 39, 110

Marketing section 37, 96, 104

Media 6, 26, 37, 88

Members section 37, 38, 39, 92, 96, 104

Mission Statement 1

MMAPSS 8, 94

Mode Group, The 22

Onslow, submarine 11, 37

Organisational developments 9

Organisation and staffing review 9, 22

National Maritime Collection 7, 31, 33, 34, 76–83

Non-financial assets 57

Non-Government funding 19, 23, 39, 44,

46, 51, 55

Notes (Financial Statements) 49-69

NZ Bicentennial Gift Fund 68

Occupational health & safety 21, 22, 110

Olympic Games, Sydney 2000 5, 21

Operating activities 46

Operating expenses 55

Operating revenues 55

Organisational chart 96

Outcomes 69

Outreach 8, 94

Overseas travel 90

Patrons 68, 91

Payables 60

Powers of the minister 111

Powers of the museum 112

Professional appointments (staff) 90

Property liaison section 96, 105

Provisions 60

Public programs 2–3, 5, 12–17, 25, 71–74

Publications (ANMM) 84

Publications (Staff) 85

Publications section 10, 37, 96, 104

Program performance reporting 20–39

Registration section 34, 96, 103

Reports by Auditor General 110

Revenues 23, 44, 51, 55

Salaries 44, 55, 97

Saltwater Country collection 5, 26, 32

Scandinavian Airlines Systems 12, 91

Schedule of commitments 47

Schedule of contingencies 48

Schools 3, 4, 25, 28–29

Secretariat 9, 96, 102

Social justice & equity 97, 110

Special projects unit 10, 102

Spirit of Australia 11

Sponsors iii, 12–17, 39, 91

Spotless Services 13, 91

Staffing levels, average 63

Staff list 102–105

Staffing overview 97

Staffing resources summary 97

Statement by Council members 41

Statutory information requirements 110

Store, The 8, 22, 23

Student/teacher visitor numbers 25, 28

Supporters 91, 92

Supporting Members 92

Sydney By Sail 22

Sydney Heritage Fleet 9, 17

Sydney Wharfies Mural, the 7

Table of contents iv

Thistle, couta fishing boat 33

Travelling exhibitions 5, 8, 12

Trust monies 67–68

US Bicentennial Gift Fund 67

USA Gallery 10, 25, 27, 33, 67, 102

Vampire, destroyer 31, 38

Vasa 2, 6, 11, 12, 28, 29

Vaughan Evans Library 8, 32, 35, 96, 103

Venue hire 3, 22, 23

Vision statement i

Visitor feedback 23

Visitor Numbers 21, 23, 28

Visitor programs section 25, 28–29, 96, 104

Visitor revenues 23

Volunteers iii, 36, 38, 39

Volunteers management 96, 104

Wallenius Wilhelmsen 12, 91

Watermarks exhibition 2, 6, 13, 21, 22, 37

Web Site ii, 8, 22, 32, 37

Welcome Wall, The 3, 6, 38, 104

Wharf 7 Maritime Heritage Centre 5, 11, 17, 21
Workplace Diversity 110

Yots Cafe 22